Tag: Nadia

SA did not know their best 11 did not have a Plan

first_imgNew Delhi: South Africa neither knew their best playing XI nor had a plan B for challenging situations and it was hardly a surprise that their World Cup campaign became a series of disasters, said Jonty Rhodes in a scathing review of the team’s performance. It is only the second time that South Africa, who still have one league game to play before boarding the flight back home, have not made it to the knock-out stages of the World Cup. “When I was asked a month ago when they started their campaign. The only thing that was going in their favour was no one was expecting much from them. Their last 12 months have not been pretty with regards to their domestic results or the international results and they did not know their best eleven,” Rhodes told PTI here in an interview on Sunday. Also Read – Dhoni, Paes spotted playing football together”So when you go to a World Cup, and you have still not finalised your eleven, I think you are in trouble. They were generously ranked three or four at the start of the World Cup but probably played as per their strength on paper,” he said on the sidelines of an event organised by ICC’s beer partner Bira 91. Rhodes, who played 52 Tests and 245 ODIs and is one of the best fielders to have played the game, said South Africa also paid the price for not having an alternate plan for tough situations. Also Read – Andy Murray to make Grand Slam return at Australian Open”In a World Cup you have to convert your 40s and 60s into hundreds. We did not do that. We did not really have a Plan B. “Plan A was to bowl fast, bowl teams out but England has two summers. One gives you cold and swinging conditions, the other is flat and hot. I think we just went there hoping to bowl people out with sheer pace. There are some good players and they are not going to succumb to short pitched bowling on good wickets.” The 49-year-old also had a lot to say on AB de Villiers wanting to make an international comeback with the World Cup after announcing a shock retirement last year. Cricket South Africa did not accept him back in the team but the entire episode triggered a massive controversy in the middle of the team’s struggling World Cup campaign. “You can’t replace ABD and you can’t accept him back in the last moment. He has been retired for a year so you can’t (have him back). I am a big fan of ABD and someone who is wanting South Africa to do well, it would be amazing to have him in the team but the team needs more than one player to do well and that is where India have been really impressive,” said Rhodes.last_img read more

UN agencies promote breastfeeding to protect babies in typhoonhit Philippines

“The estimated 12,000 babies to be born in the worst-affected areas this month need to be exclusively breastfed, meaning that they get nothing but breast milk, which protects them from potentially deadly infections,” the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) said in a joint news release issued yesterday.They said that around one third of babies in the area born before the disaster who are less than six months old are already exclusively breastfed, and nine out of ten were at least partially breastfed before the emergency. The mothers who were doing at least some breastfeeding need to be supported to transition to exclusive breastfeeding.“The uncontrolled distribution and use of infant formula in emergency situations like this – where there are serious water and sanitation challenges and other disease risks – is extremely dangerous,” said Dr. Julie Hall, WHO Representative in the Philippines.“Supporting breastfeeding is one of the most important things we can do to protect babies in areas of the Philippines hit by the typhoon.”During emergency situations, disease and death rates among babies and children are higher than for any other age group, the agencies noted. Babies who drink formula made with water that is contaminated with germs or given with an unsterile bottle or teat, can become very sick with diarrhoea and die within a matter of hours.“Feeding babies with formula in emergencies must only be considered as a last resort, when other safer options – such as helping non-breastfeeding mothers to reinitiate breastfeeding, finding a wet nurse or pasteurized breast milk from a breast milk bank – have first been fully explored,” they stated.UNICEF and WHO strongly urged all who are involved in funding, planning and implementing the emergency response in the Philippines to avoid unnecessary illness and death by promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding. Community leaders are called on to monitor and report any donations that may undermine breastfeeding.Some 14.4 million people are affected by the typhoon, which also displaced about 3.6 million people. Ongoing priority needs include food aid and access to water, urgent and extensive shelter requirements, and recovery of livelihoods.Meanwhile, medical teams organized by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) have started delivering reproductive health services to expecting and nursing mothers in evacuation centres for those displaced by the typhoon.The first medical missions, on 26 November, went to the two largest centres in the devastated city of Tacloban where 44 pregnant women and 33 breastfeeding mothers received care. Each was tested for vital signs, given a gynaecological consultation and a test for infections. Pregnant women were given prenatal exams, including ultrasound. In addition, midwives dispensed medicines and information about family planning methods. A counsellor was available for women showing signs of psychological trauma. The team went to two more sites yesterday and served clients from 14 evacuation centres.While all of Tacloban’s medical facilities were heavily damaged by the typhoon’s fierce winds and tidal surge, a number have reopened and are now able to provide safe delivery services, including three that can provide caesarean sections.There are some 230,000 pregnant women among the millions affected by the typhoon. Nearly 900 are giving birth each day, with around 130 likely to experience potentially life-threatening complications, according to UNFPA. read more