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Mrs. Helen Frances (Ford) Stewart

first_imgMrs. Helen Frances (Ford) Stewart, age 98, of Cincinnati, Ohio, formerly of Kettering, Ohio, entered this life on September 5, 1921 in Mt. Sterling, Indiana. She was the loving daughter of the late Henry George and Elsie R. (Gibbs) Ford. Helen was raised in Mt. Sterling, Indiana where she attended the Mt. Sterling Grammar School and graduated from Vevay High School in 1940. One week after graduating from high school, she attended Miller School of Business in Cincinnati, Ohio. Helen was a member of the Mt. Sterling Baptist Church and was baptized in the church on October 19, 1933 by Pastor Carlisle. Helen was united in marriage on March 5, 1945 to Robert K. Stewart in Vallejo, California and they shared 58 years together until Robert’s passing on October 4, 2003. Helen was formerly employed for 5 years at Wright Aeronautical (now known as GE), 3 years at Montgomery Ward and 13 years for Arnold Hawk Cuthbertson, until they merged with Deloitte, where she continued to work another 20 years until retiring in 1983. During her lifetime, she lived in Cincinnati, Ohio; Kettering, Ohio; Vallejo, California; Chicago, Illinois; but lived most of her life (63 years) in Dayton, Ohio. In May 2013, she moved back to Cincinnati and resided at Eastgate Village Retirement facility to be closer to her son and daughter. Helen enjoyed and was faithful in attending church services and Bible studies. She also enjoyed cooking, gardening, bowling and traveling. She was able to visit a major portion of the U.S. and took several overseas trips with her husband. Helen passed away at 10:00 a.m., Thursday, December 5, 2019, at the Hospice of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio.Helen will be missed by her daughter, Debra J. Crosby and her husband, Bruce of Moscow, OH; her 6-grandchildren, Erin, Kelli, Genny, Dana, Amanda and Wyatt; 7-great-grandchildren, Roman, Avery, Eliza, Finn, Vivienne, Adi and Gracie and her several nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert K. Stewart, died October 4, 2003; her son, Gregory D. Stewart, died September 2014; her parents, Henry George and Elsie R. (Gibbs) Ford; her brothers, George, Robert “Bobby”, James Henry and Paul Ford; her sister, Mary Ann (Ford) Ricketts, died January 27, 2018; her niece, Kimberly Ford and her nephew, Michael Lee “Mike” Ricketts, died February 26, 2005.Funeral services will be conducted Monday, December 9, 2019, at 1:00 p.m., by Rev. Ron Lee and Bill Ford at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street, Vevay, Indiana 47043.Interment will follow in the Vevay Cemetery, Vevay, Indiana.Friends may call from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Monday, December 9, 2019, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street, Vevay, Indiana 47043.Memorial contributions may be made to Guiding Eyes for the Blind. Cards are available at the funeral home or online at www.haskellandmorrison.comlast_img read more

Nobel laureate discusses astrophysics, cosmology

first_imgMany scientists now believe that the universe is expanding at an accelerating pace, but this phenomenon was first discovered by Adam Riess, a Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist. Riess spoke at Bovard Auditorium on Monday about measurements of distant supernova that led to his discovery as part of the USC Dornsife Irene McCullouch Distinguished Lecture series.“The reason I got into this field was to answer profound questions like when did the universe begin,” Riess said. “I wanted to devise and perform real science experiments to answer these.”Riess has held the Bloomberg Distinguished Professorship, the Thomas J. Barber Professorship of Physics and Astronomy and the Krieger-Eisenhower Professorship of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. He is also a senior member of the science staff at the Space Telescope Science Institute.Along with Brian Schmidt and Saul Perlmutter, Riess received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for providing evidence that supported the phenomenon. The scientists were also awarded the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics and shared the $1 million Shaw Prize in Astronomy in 2006. Along with his other awards, Riess was also honored with the Albert Einstein Medal in 2011 and the 2008 MacArthur Fellowship.According to Riess, one of the most important unsolved problems in cosmology and astrophysics is understanding the unexplained and mysterious nature of dark energy. While discussing the discovery of the accelerating universe, Riess explained that the farther away a galaxy is from us, the faster it will appear to recede.“The key is to measure how far away the galaxies are and how fast they recede from us,” Riess said. “In particular, measuring distance is the hardest thing to do in space.”The distances on earth are measured using various methods such as parallax, lighthouses, foghorns and objects of known size. However, these methods involve human creations, so in space, distance measurement uses the standard candle approach.“A galaxy has millions of stars that have known luminosity and can be used as standard candles,” Riess said. “When one of these stars explodes, it could be as bright as 4 billion times the luminosity of the sun. In addition, the inverse square law states that intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source of that physical quantity.”The other property that Riess and his team needed to measure is the speed at which the galaxies are rushing away from the earth. They did so by looking at the nature of the light coming from distant objects.“A supernova emits light at known wavelengths, and because of the expansion of space, the wavelengths are stretched [and] it gets redder,” Riess said. “This redshift measures the apparent recession velocity of the galaxies.”The Hubble Constant, H0, which is the measured slope or the linear relation between the velocity and distance, gives the present expansion rate of the universe. If the universe would contract instead of expand, then this slope would be negative.According to Riess, we can measure that expansion rate by using the Hubble Constant. By taking the inverse of the rate, the approximate age of the universe can be calculated.“It is not very likely to stare at one galaxy and find a supernova,” Riess said. “However, if you stare at 100 galaxies for one year, you are likely to see a supernova, and if you stare at 1,000 galaxies, you will see 10 supernovae in a year.”Riess studied four supernovae in his thesis. He discovered accelerating expansion and dark energy in 1998 and confirmed it with more distant supernovae from the Hubble telescope. In 2009, they could find tens of supernovae at greater distances.“The supernovae slowly showed us that the universe was decelerating before it slowly started accelerating,” Riess said. “So we removed both models that we thought we were choosing between and ended up with this new model when the universe began to accelerate five billion years ago.”The reason for the acceleration of the universe remains unknown. Riess and his team have hypothesized that the source is vacuum energy, also known as the cosmological constant, dynamical dark energy or modified gravity. They also expect to learn more about the nature of dark energy in the next decade from a spate of different measurements, including a refurbished Hubble Space Telescope.last_img read more

Wacha, Beltran help Cards even World Series 1-all

first_imgIn this multiple exposure image, St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Michael Wacha throws during the fifth inning of Game 2 of baseball’s World Series against the Boston Red Sox Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum) by Ronald BlumAP Sports WriterBOSTON (AP) — One is 22, brimming with vigor and riding a hot streak in the dawn of his career, the other is 36, injected with a painkiller just to make it on the field and refusing to succumb to discomfort during his first and perhaps last chance to earn that elusive ring.Michael Wacha and Carlos Beltran, both trying to make the most of their first World Series, helped lift the St. Louis Cardinals to a 4-2 victory over the Boston Red Sox on Thursday night that evened the matchup at a game apiece.“It’s the World Series, big-time game,” Wacha said.Wacha bested John Lackey in a matchup of present and past rookie sensations, Beltran provided a big hit and this time it was the Red Sox who were tripped up by fielding failures.“Somebody would have to kill me in order for me to get out of the lineup,” said Beltran, undeterred by bruised ribs that landed him in the hospital a night earlier. St. Louis Cardinals’ Matt Holliday (7), Jon Jay (19) and Carlos Beltran (3) celebrate after Game 2 of baseball’s World Series against the Boston Red Sox Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Matt Holliday tripled and scored on Yadier Molina’s fourth-inning grounder, but David Ortiz put Boston ahead 2-1 in the sixth when he pounced on an 85 mph changeup for a two-run homer just over the Green Monster in left field.That ended Wacha’s scoreless streak at 18 2-3 innings — a rookie record for a single postseason — but it was all he gave up. Selected by St. Louis last year with the first-round draft pick received as compensation when Albert Pujols signed with the Los Angeles Angels, Wacha has been so good lately that a St. Louis restaurant he walked into had named a milkshake after him, the “Wacha Wacha.”Wacha, the NL championship series MVP after beating Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw twice, threw a career-high 114 pitches and allowed two runs, three hits and four walks in six innings with six strikeouts. He improved to 4-0 with a 1.00 ERA in four outings this postseason, matching the amount of regular-season wins he has in his brief career.“They don’t swing at bad pitches, really,” Wacha said. “They did a good job tonight grinding out at-bats with me and got the pitch count up.”But then Lackey, who in 2002 with the Angels became the first rookie in 93 years to win a World Series seventh game, faltered in a three-run seventh. St. Louis went ahead when Matt Carpenter hit a sacrifice fly that led to a pair of runs, with the second scoring on errors by catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia and reliever Craig Breslow — both making their Series debuts.Beltran, an eight-time All-Star, followed with an RBI single. He had been sent to a hospital for scans Wednesday night after bruising ribs while banging into the right-field fence to rob Ortiz of a grand slam. Beltran appeared to be wearing protective padding under his jersey.“When I left the ballpark yesterday, I had very little hope that I was going to be in the lineup with the way I felt,” he said. “When I woke up, I woke up feeling a little better. And I came to the ballpark, talked to the trainer. I was able to get treatment and talk to the doctors, and find a way to try anything I could try just to go out there and feel no pain.”He said he took an injection of Toradol to block the pain for five or six hours.“The good thing is tomorrow I have the day off,” he said.When the Series resumes Saturday night in St. Louis, Jake Peavy starts for the Red Sox and Joe Kelly for the Cardinals. Twenty-nine of the previous 55 teams that won Game 2 to tie the Series went on to take the title.“Excited to get home. I know everybody is,” Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said.St. Louis’ hard-throwing bullpen combined for one-hit relief. Carlos Martinez got six outs, retiring Mike Napoli on an inning-ending popup with two on in the eighth. Trevor Rosenthal struck out the side on 11 pitches in the ninth for a save, whiffing Daniel Nava with a 99 mph fastball to end it.Seeking its second championship in three seasons, St. Louis improved to 7-0 this postseason when scoring first and stopped Boston’s World Series winning streak at nine. That run began with a sweep of the Cardinals in 2004, when St. Louis never led the entire Series.This year’s opener was more of the same, when the Cardinals made three errors and the Red Sox romped 8-1.Lackey, pitching a day after his 35th birthday, returned this year after missing all of 2012 due to elbow surgery. In his first Series appearance since his Game 7 win 11 years earlier, he couldn’t hold the lead Ortiz gave him with his 17th postseason homer, his fifth this year.“We’ve got to go out there and play better than we did tonight,” Ortiz said. “Nobody can dictate that you’re going to win four straight games every time you go out there for the World Series.”NOTES: The Red Sox had not lost in the Series since Game 7 in 1986 against the New York Mets. … With no DH allowed in the NL ballpark, Boston manager John Farrell said Ortiz will likely play first base in Game 3. Napoli would sit. … Victims of the Boston Marathon bombings were honored during the seventh-inning stretch as singer James Taylor led the crowd in “America the Beautiful.”last_img read more

Suisham’s winner lifts Steelers over Browns 30-27

first_imgPittsburgh Steelers kicker Shaun Suisham (6), left, is congratulated by teammates agter hitting a 41-yard field goal as time ran out in the fourth quarter of the NFL football game against the Cleveland Browns on Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014 in Pittsburgh. The Steelers won 30-27. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)PITTSBURGH (AP) — Johnny Manziel’s time is coming. For now, the most famous backup quarterback in football is merely a student.Brian Hoyer, the journeyman veteran who beat out the Heisman Trophy winner for the starting job in Cleveland, provided a lesson in resilience on Sunday. Then Ben Roethlisberger and the Pittsburgh Steelers provided another in how to finish.Again.Roethlisberger hit Markus Wheaton twice during a last-gasp drive to set up Shaun Suisham’s 41-yard field goal as the Steelers survived 30-27.“Well, that was exciting, wasn’t it?” joked Steelers coach Mike Tomlin.That’s one way of putting it. Another might be harrowing after Pittsburgh let a 24-point lead evaporate.Still, in the end it was Roethlisberger doing what he always seems to do when he faces the Browns. Roethlisberger improved to 18-1 against Cleveland after one last audible set up Wheaton for a 20-yard gain.“When (Suisham) lines up to kick it, I was on the sideline like, ‘This was why we have him,’” Roethlisberger said. “There was never a doubt he was going to make it.”There never is when the Browns (0-1) play in Pittsburgh (1-0). Cleveland hasn’t beaten the Steelers on the road in 11 years, though for the first time in a long time the gap in the decidedly one-sided rivalry appears to be narrowing.Roethlisberger passed for 365 yards and a touchdown, running back Le’Veon Bell had 197 total yards and a score and Antonio Brown caught five passes for 116 yards with a touchdown. Brown added a highly entertaining (if illegal) kick to the face of Cleveland punter Spencer Lanning — and still the Steelers needed every last second to hold off the Browns.“We can’t apologize for the way we win,” Roethlisberger said. “We just have to win games.”Cleveland’s second-half rally came without receiver Josh Gordon (suspension), running back Ben Tate, who left in the second quarter with a knee injury, and tight end Jordan Cameron (shoulder).It also came without Manziel. He spent his NFL debut in a baseball cap watching Hoyer nearly engineer one of the unlikeliest upsets since the franchise’s reincarnation in 1999.The northern Ohio native who was nearly out of football when the Steelers gave him a short stint as a backup in 2012 completed 19 of 31 passes for 230 yards and a 9-yard touchdown to Travis Benjamin. That tied the game at 27 with 11:15 to go.“I told those guys at the end of the game that I’ll take that team to the end of the Earth if we’re going to fight back like that,” Hoyer said.Scrapping is nothing new to Hoyer, who held off Manziel during an uninspired training camp battle. Coach Mike Pettine promised the well-traveled Hoyer he wouldn’t have to spend games looking over his shoulder. Pettine flatly answered “no” when asked if he considered going to Manziel after the Browns fell behind 27-3 at the half.“The way the game went we just never felt the need for him,” Pettine said.The Browns ditched their methodical attack for an uptempo no-huddle that kept Pittsburgh off-balance. When Tate went to the sideline, rookies Terrance West and Isaiah Crowell provided a jolt.West darted for 100 yards and Crowell scored a pair of second-half touchdowns as the Browns somehow pulled even.It just wasn’t enough. After sometimes frantic play for the first 50 minutes, both teams squandered chances to take control. Cleveland’s last gasp came with a first down its  20 with 1:53 to go. A sack, an incompletion and an ill-advised screen gave the Steelers the ball back at their 43.Roethlisberger found Wheaton for an 11-yard gain on second down and connected with Wheaton again at the Cleveland 24. Suisham, who signed a contract extension during training camp, smacked the winner down the middle.Earlier, surrounded by playmakers and emboldened by an expanded no-huddle offense, Roethlisberger passed for 278 yards — including a beautiful 35-yard rainbow touchdown to Brown — in the first 30 minutes as the Steelers raced to the 27-3 halftime lead.The highlight came on a rollicking punt return by Brown in the second quarter. He tried to leap over Lanning, only to have his cleat smash into Lanning’s face. The play drew an unnecessary roughness penalty on Brown — perhaps the first ever by a punt returner — and comic laughter from the sun-splashed crowd delighting in what appeared to be  another mauling in a series full of them.“I tried to get over him,” Brown said. “There was no intent to hurt him. It was just a bad outcome of a play.”The penalty hardly stopped the Steelers, who needed two plays to spring Bell for a 38-yard touchdown run that made it 24-3.NOTES: Cameron caught two passes for 47 yards before aggravating a shoulder injury that has bothered him all summer. … The Steelers are 11-1 in their last 12 home openers. … Pittsburgh RB Dri Archer left the game with left knee and ankle injuries and did not return.___AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more