Tag: 聚仙阁杭州论坛

Two journalists arrested after being lured with interview invitation

first_imgPuntland’s journalists are often subjected to intimidation, threats and arbitrary arrest. With 119 journalists, Radio Daljir is one of the region’s biggest and most popular media outlets and is often attacked over its reporting. Radio Daljir journalists have been arrested three times since the start of the year. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is appalled that the authorities in Garowe, the capital of northeastern Somalia’s semi-autonomous Puntland region, arrested two journalists after first luring them with the promise of an interview about a controversial murder case. Somalia is ranked 163rd out of 180 countries in the 2020 Index. RSF_en News February 24, 2021 Find out more Former Radio Daljir director Ahmed Sheikh Mohamed, also known as “Tallman,” was jailed for several weeksa year ago after reporting that a detainee had died after being tortured during police interrogation. The interview did not materialize. As soon as the two journalists arrived at the courthouse, they were arrested and taken to Garowe’s main prison. They were finally freed yesterday but continue to be subject to judicial proceedings even if they have not yet been told the charges, the station’s director said when reached by RSF as he left the prison. RSF and NUSOJ call for release of a journalist held in Somalia’s Puntland region News “It is shocking that the judicial authorities arrest journalists after first luring them into a trap with the promise of an interview,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “These arrests are grossly unjust and trample on the most basic principles of law and public morality, which the authorities are supposed to embody. The authorities must drop the proceedings against these reporters, who were just doing their job, and must end all persecution of media and journalists in Puntland.” RSF tried to reach Puntland’s president and interior minister by messages and emails but neither had responded at the time of writing this press release. Le directeur de Radio Daljir Khadar Awl Ismail, accompagné de son reporter Abdiqani Ahmed Mohamed à leur sortie de prison. Crédit : Radio Daljir The police arrested Radio Daljir director Khadar Awl Ismail and reporter Abdiqani Ahmed Mohamed when they went to Garowe’s court of first instance on 6 September in response to an invitation to interview the judicial authorities about the acquittal of the men accused of raping and murdering a woman in 2019. RSF requests urgent adoption of moratorium on arrests of journalists SomaliaAfrica Condemning abusesMedia independence ImprisonedFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment center_img The invitation was issued after the victim’s family denounced the defendants’ acquittal as a judicial travesty on the air on Radio Daljir. Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Somalia News to go further SomaliaAfrica Condemning abusesMedia independence ImprisonedFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment March 2, 2021 Find out more RSF has for months been calling for a moratorium on arrests of journalists in Somalia. The moratorium was proposed to then Prime Minister Hassane Ali Khayre during a meeting in Paris last November and in a letter sent to President Mohamed Farmaajo after the publication of RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. Organisation Receive email alerts Radio reporter gunned on city street in central Somalia News September 8, 2020 Two journalists arrested after being lured with interview invitation January 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

A map of the human heart

first_imgScientists have created a detailed cellular and molecular map of the healthy human heart to understand how this vital organ functions and to shed light on what goes awry in cardiovascular disease.The work, published in Nature Sept. 24 was led by investigators at Harvard Medical School, Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in Germany, Imperial College London and their global collaborators.The team analyzed almost a half million individual cells to build the most extensive cell atlas of the human heart to date. The atlas shows the huge diversity of cells and reveals heart muscle cell types, cardiac protective immune cells and an intricate network of blood vessels. It also predicts how the cells communicate to keep the heart working. The research is part of the Human Cell Atlas initiative to map every cell type in the human body. The new molecular and cellular knowledge of the heart promises to enable better understanding of heart disease and guide the development of highly individualized treatments. The work also sets the stage for therapies based on regenerative medicine in the future, the researchers said.Over a lifetime, the average human heart delivers more than 2 billion life-sustaining beats to the body. In doing so, it helps deliver oxygen and nutrients to cells, tissues and organs and enables the removal of carbon dioxide and waste products. Each day, the heart beats around 100,000 times with a one-way flow through four different chambers, varying speed with rest, exercise and stress. Every beat requires an exquisitely complex but perfect synchronization across various cells in different parts of heart. When this complex coordination goes bad, it can result in cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, killing an estimated 17.9 million people each year. Detailing the molecular processes inside the cells of a healthy heart is critical to understanding how things go awry in heart disease. Such knowledge can lead to more precise, better treatment strategies for various forms of cardiovascular illness. “Millions of people are undergoing treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Understanding the healthy heart will help us understand interactions between cell types and cell states that can allow lifelong function and how these differ in diseases,” said study co-senior author Christine Seidman, professor of medicine in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School and a cardiovascular geneticist at Brigham and Women’s. “Ultimately, these fundamental insights may suggest specific targets that can lead to individualized therapies in the future, creating personalized medicines for heart disease and improving the effectiveness of treatments for each patient,” Seidman said. This is what researchers set out to do in the new study. The team studied nearly 500,000 individual cells and cell nuclei from six different regions of the heart obtained from 14 organ donors whose hearts were healthy but unsuitable for transplantation. Using a combination of single-cell analysis, machine learning and imaging techniques, the team could see exactly which genes were switched on and off in each cell. The researchers discovered major differences in the cells in different areas of the heart. They also observed that each area of the heart had specific subsets of cells — a finding that points to different developmental origins and suggests that these cells would respond differently to treatments.“This project marks the beginning of new understandings into how the heart is built from single cells, many with different cell states,” said study co-first author Daniel Reichart, research fellow in genetics at Harvard Medical School. “With knowledge of the regional differences throughout the heart, we can begin to consider the effects of age, exercise and disease and help push the field of cardiology toward the era of precision medicine.” “This is the first time anyone has looked at the single cells of the human heart at this scale, which has only become possible with large-scale single-cell sequencing,” said Norbert Hübner, co-senior author and professor at Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine. “This study shows the power of single-cell genomics and international collaboration,” he added. “Knowledge of the full range of cardiac cells and their gene activity is a fundamental necessity to understand how the heart functions and to start to unravel how it responds to stress and disease.”As part of this study, the researchers also looked at blood vessels running through the heart in unprecedented detail. The atlas showed how the cells in these veins and arteries are adapted to the different pressures and locations and how this could help researchers understand what goes wrong in blood vessels during coronary heart disease.“Our international effort provides an invaluable set of information to the scientific community by illuminating the cellular and molecular details of cardiac cells that work together to pump blood around the body,” said co-senior author Michela Noseda of Imperial College, London. “We mapped the cardiac cells that can be potentially infected by SARS-CoV-2 and found that specialized cells of the small blood vessels are also virus targets,” she said. “Our datasets are a goldmine of information to understand subtleties of heart disease.”The researchers also focused on understanding cardiac repair, looking at how the immune cells interact and communicate with other cells in the healthy heart and how this differs from skeletal muscle. Further research will include investigating whether any heart cells could be induced to repair themselves.“This great collaborative effort is part of the global Human Cell Atlas initiative to create a ‘Google map’ of the human body,” said Sarah Teichmann of the Wellcome Sanger Institute, co-senior author of the study and co-chair of the Human Cell Atlas Organising Committee. “Openly available to researchers worldwide, the Heart Cell Atlas is a fantastic resource, which will lead to new understanding of heart health and disease, new treatments and potentially even finding ways of regenerating damaged heart tissue,” she said.This study was supported by the British Heart Foundation, European Research Council, Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany, Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislaufforschung e.V., Leducq Fondation, German Research Foundation, Chinese Council Scholarship, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, EMBO, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Alberta Innovates, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome, U.S. National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Jonathan Seidman, the Henrietta B. and Frederick H. Bugher Foundation Professor of Genetics in the Blavatnik Institute at HMS, is also co-senior author. Monika Litviňuková and Carlos Talavera-López of the Sanger Institute and Henrike Maatz of the Max Delbrück Center are co-first authors with Daniel Reichart.last_img read more

Rental demand jumps in Qld; Mackay’s vacancy rate the tightest in the state: REIQ

first_imgThe rental vacancy rate in Mackay has fallen from 1.9 per cent to 0.9 per cent in three months. Picture: Rob Maccoll.The rental vacancy rate in Mackay fell from 1.9 per cent to 0.9 per cent in just three months, which means the city is pretty much full.Rents are also on the rise, increasing in the range of 10 to 20 per cent over the past year, with two-bedroom houses and three-bedroom units reporting annual growth in the weekly median rent of $50. Mackay has the tightest rental vacancy rate in Queensland at 0.9 per cent.REIQ chief executive Antonia Mercorella said the strength of the regional economy and the employment market were driving the increase in demand for rentals.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus16 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market16 hours agoAbout 3900 new job opportunities were created in Mackay in the year to August — putting downward pressure on the jobless rate, which is now just 3.3 per cent.“As the state’s economy improves and the jobs market in regional Queensland strengthens, we are seeing people returning to those areas and are looking first for rental accommodation,” Ms Mercorella said. “Markets such as Mackay, Toowoomba and Bundaberg, which are tight, are stabilising after a period of correction.” Local agents take down a ‘For Rent’ sign in Cairns, which is one of the tightest coastal rental markets in Queensland.IT has become almost impossible to find a property to rent in Mackay, with the regional city’s vacancy rate now the tightest in Queensland. The latest Real Estate Institute of Queensland residential vacancy rate report shows the coastal market’s vacancy rate tightened by a whopping 100 basis points in the September quarter. REIQ chief executive Antonia Mercorella.The report found rental markets in the largest regional centres continued strengthening during the quarter as median rents trended upwards, particularly in Mackay, Rockhampton and Toowoomba.Rockhampton’s rental market moved into the tight range for the first time in six years, as vacancies shrank from 3 per cent in June to 2.3 per cent in September.The Fraser Coast and Cairns markets are the tightest coastal rental markets in Queensland with regional vacancies of 1.4 per cent.Steady rents are boosting the rental market on the Fraser Coast, with well-priced rental properties snaring a tenant in less than a week on average.The report found only two of the major regional markets in the state — Gladstone and Townsville — were weak, with vacancies above 3.5 per cent but below 4.5 per cent.Overall, the state’s rental market strengthened again in the September quarter, with 27 markets classified as tight by the REIQ, four as healthy and four as weak.The greater Brisbane rental market held steady at 2.2 per cent, but the local government area of Redland reported one of the region’s tightest vacancies of 1.5 per cent. The Brisbane LGA rental vacancy rate has tightened to 2 per cent. Image: AAP/Darren England.The Brisbane LGA tightened to 2 per cent, with vacancies for both the inner and middle ring falling to the tight range during the September quarter.“Even though this market has tightened to 2 per cent vacancies, we are hearing that pockets of the inner city are oversupplied and tenants are still negotiating well on terms,” Ms Mercorella said.She said the state’s increasing population growth would require more rental supply.last_img read more

Vardy commits to Foxes

first_img Press Association The 27-year-old joined Leicester in the summer of 2012 from Fleetwood Town and has netted 21 times in 70 appearances for the club, including 16 goals last term as the Foxes won the Sky Bet Championship title. Vardy, who was named Players’ Player of the Year by his Leicester team-mates for last season, told lcfc.com: “I’m over the moon. We all know that the club wants to keep improving and stay in the Premier League, and I definitely want to be a part of that. “Everyone knows the way that I’ve come back into football (from non-league), and we managed to get promoted last season, but now it’s all about making sure that we stay in the Premier League. “(Manager) Nigel Pearson brought me here and he wants the club to maintain their Premier League status. He was a big influence (on him signing a new deal) and now I’ve just got to repay him on the field.” Vardy joins Danny Drinkwater, Matty James, Liam Moore, Wes Morgan, David Nugent, Jeff Schlupp, Kasper Schmeichel, Gary Taylor-Fletcher and Marcin Wasilewski in signing new deals since winning Leicester secured promotion in April. center_img Leicester striker Jamie Vardy has signed a new four-year contract tying him to the Barclays Premier League newcomers until June, 2018.last_img read more