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Want to continue improving as cricketer, says Cheteshwar Pujara

first_imgCheteshwar Pujara, who has been India’s backbone when it comes to Test cricket and would be playing his 50th Test match against Sri Lanka in Colombo, said that he wants to keep performing for the team and improve his performance with each passing day.”Playing the 50th test match for the country, it will be a proud moment for me. When I started playing cricket, I thought that test cricket is something I always wanted to play. And, when I have to represent India for the 50th test match it will be a proud moment. I want to keep performing and continue improving as a cricketer. I am confident that I can add few more shots in my batting,” Pujara said here.”One of the most challenging times of my career was when I was out for six months; I got injured again in 2011 and didn’t play for an year. So, that I don’t catch any more injuries. But obviously you cannot guarantee anything,” he added.He further said that 2010 was the most crucial year for him when he made his debut.”I remember my 1st test as I wanted to play with legends like Sachin Tendulkar, Rahul Dravid, Saurav Ganguly, Virendra Sehwag.I think playing domestic cricket did help me as a player,” he added.Pujara was dropped from the Test team during the tour of West Indies last year. But since his return to the team, India have played 15 Tests and Pujara has emerged as the team’s highest run-getter.advertisementIn a stellar Test career of 49 matches, the 29-year-old has scored 3942 runs at an average of 53.27. He has scored 12 centuries, with a top score of 206*. And, one could only expect this Rajkot lad to continue with this conventional, gritty, gutsy style of batting and score more runs for India.last_img read more

Signed Gehrig Glove Up For 200K

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares GREENWICH, Conn. — It was some 80 years ago that Lou Gehrig and the 12-year-old son of a songwriter got bored with talk of music and opted to play catch instead.The legendary New York Yankees slugger and the boy were fast friends and next time they tossed the ball around the front yard, Gehrig brought Howard Henderson — a fellow lefty — a better glove.The autographed mitt — “To Howard. I hope you have much luck with this glove as I did. Lou Gehrig.” — will be auctioned off July 15. It is expected to sell for between $200,000 and $300,000.Henderson, now a retired architect who lives in Greenwich, turns 92 on July 4. That’s also the 75th anniversary of Gehrig’s famous July 4th farewell speech at Yankee Stadium, in which he called himself “the luckiest man on the face of the Earth” despite being diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.Henderson was used to encountering the famous such as actor Jimmy Durante and actress Ethel Merman. But Gehrig stood out, literally.“I was impressed. He was big,” Henderson said, cupping his hands far apart to describe the size of his calves. “He was a very nice guy, probably one of the nicest people in baseball.”Gehrig and his wife, Eleanor, were friends with Henderson’s father, Ray. Gehrig’s wife aspired to be a songwriter herself, Henderson said. “We weren’t interested. Somebody suggested let’s go out on the front lawn and play catch,” Henderson said.Gehrig promised to bring Henderson a better glove the next time he visited the family’s Bronxville, New York, home. “He said ‘this one is already broken in. I used it for part of the season,’” Henderson said.David Hunt, President of Hunt Auctions, which is selling the glove and a photo on behalf of Henderson, said he’s confident it is Gehrig’s signed glove but can’t prove he used it in a game, though he likely did. Hunt said they couldn’t find the exact glove among the photos of Gehrig, but found images of very similar mitts Gehrig wore in the 1930s.“It’s our strong belief that this has a wonderful chance of being a glove that not only did Gehrig sign and inscribe but actually used,” Hunt said.Henderson and Gehrig kept in touch after their front lawn tosses. Henderson once visited him in the dugout and, later, at his home as the hall of famer’s health worsened because of the condition that would later be commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.Gehrig was dying when Henderson visited him at his home in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, but was cautioned by Gehrig’s wife not to talk about his illness and to keep the visit short. Gehrig was in a bathrobe and slippers, sitting in a wheelchair at the dining room table.A friend came into the house and walked around the room, suddenly grabbing the flowers in a vase and eating them like peanuts. It was Pitzy Katz, a comedian. “Lou said, ‘Stop eating the flowers. Laughing hurts,’” Henderson said.(JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN)last_img read more

Ki Sungyueng announces retirement from international football

first_imgNewcastle United midfielder Ki Sung-yueng has announced in an official letter sent to the South Korean FA that he will be retiring from international football.Ki who is also the captain of the South Korean National team has been in the international football scene for 11 years.He made the announcement after he sustained injury while on international duty even though he had earlier planned to retire after the 2018 World Cup but South Korea convinced him to play one more tournament.“With the 2019 Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Asian Cup being my last event, I’m laying down the big honor and responsibility of the national team,” Ki said, in a letter sent to Korean Football Association and obtained by The Korea Herald.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“In my football career, the national team was more valuable than anything else. I want to thank fans who have loved and supported me for all this time.“The national team is having a difficult time after we failed to meet fans’ expectations at the Asian Cup, but I believe our players will overcome the difficulties under Bento’s guidance,“Now, I will be one of the football fans who support the national team and will wish the best for South Korean football.last_img read more

The origins of polarized nervous systems

first_imgComb Jelly from phylum Ctenophora. Credit: ctenophore.wikispaces.com (Phys.org)—There is no mistaking the first action potential you ever fired. It was the one that blocked all the other sperm from stealing your egg. After that, your spikes only got more interesting. Waves of calcium flooding the jointly-forged cell stiffened its glycoprotein-enhanced walls against all other suitors and kicked off the developmental program ultimately responsible for constructing your brain. Unlike the nervous systems of the lower forms of life, our neurons have a clearly polarized form—a single output axon projecting far to parts unknown is charged by input dendrites feeding on the local metabolic soup de jour. The origins of this polarity in neurons, and therefore in nervous systems in general, are written in the primitive body plans of the mostly gelatinous organisms still hailing intact across deep time. Journal information: Journal of Experimental Biology This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: The origins of polarized nervous systems (2015, March 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-polarized-nervous.html Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones How a blunt multipurpose neuronal toolkit that originally evolved to nourish was morphed into the precise cellular utensils we now use to mince the world is the subject of a new special issue in the Journal of Experimental Biology (JEB). The story of the acquisition of polarity, or rather the loss of universality, in the flow of resource through crude nerve nets is the story of our brains. Last year,Tim Jegla from Penn State published work showing that the human Erg potassium channels that are tuned to repolarize the long action potentials underlying the strong muscular contractions of our hearts have their origins in the earliest nervous systems ever evolved. Since then he has been piecing our brains together by tracing the evolution of related channels like the EAG potassium channels, and the so-called Shaker potassium channels in various primitive organisms. The creatures that have been the most informative mostly fall into taxonomic groups of typically radially-symmetric animals named with a strange variation on the letter C. The ‘cnidarians’ are animals like hydras and the true jellyfish, while the ‘ctenophores’ are the comb jellies that swim with cilia. In an article on polarity written together with Melissa Rolls, Tim explores how the positioning of different kinds of channels by the cytoskeleton (at places like the axon initial segment, nodes, and dendrites) is crucial for establishing directional signalling in neurons. So I asked him point blank if he could nail down when polarity first evolved. He said it was likely in an ancestor of the parahoxozons, a group defined by their possession of at least one of the Hox/ParaHox genes associated with the the specification of the body axis. With genetic experiments now in progress in his lab Jegla is looking for indications that polar neurons exist, contrary to the current literature, even in the lowly sea anemone. As cnidarians, anemone are privy to the benefits of parahoxozoans, something the ctenophores cannot claim. More information: Journal of Experimental Biology, jeb.biologists.org/content/current © 2015 Phys.org In looking for larger developmental trends in which to anchor the idea of increased polarity, or loss of flexibility in neurons, ctenophores may have other secrets to tell. One author writing in the special issue of JEB suggests that recent whole genome data puts ctenophores as a sister group to all other animals, placing them at the earliest branching lineage—a move which would make them a more basal metazoan than even SpongeBob himself. Two factors which complicate such analysis are convergent evolution and the loss of genes and function. We might imagine that the possibility of having at least two independent origins for neural systems exists regardless of which lineage was prior.It has been known since the work of Chun in 1880 that when ctenophore blastomeres are separated at the two-cell stage each half-embryo develops exactly half of adult structures. It seems that this high degree of determinism at the organism level, which fades in the progression of species, contrasts with the aquisition of specification at the cell level. Among the important proteins known to exist in these primitive organisms are various kinds of G-protein coupled receptors and gap junctions. Originally it looks like these proteins played important roles in cell adhesion and communication, and therefore in early development and specification of the body plan. Enzymes to synthesize and transport neurotransmitters were also present early on. A trend in moving to more advanced body plans, and neurons, is the restriction of the expression of these transmitter systems to specific cells. On top of this there is an inexorable refinement of multipurpose symmetric synapses into asymmetric synaptic diodes, with concommitant exclusivity of transmitter profile in both dense core and clear vessicles. In creature like planarians, worms, or flies, the percentage of neurons we might call ‘polar’ becomes an increasingly important thing for us to take account of. In C. elegans for example, many neurons, with the exception of the elaborate and highly branched sensory neurons that span the whole body, are fairly simple with just a few processess containing synapses that can be both pre and post synaptic. The neurons of many insects, like drosophila, are conspicuous for their dense regions of idiosyncratic branching where the terms dendrite or axon would seem to have little meaning. While the neurons of higher and larger vertebrates are expected to in a sense ‘feel’ every spike they might pull off throughout the whole neuron, it paradoxically seems that tiny invertebrate neurons none-the-less are more likely to contain isolated domains of protected metabolic and electrical activity. The details of all this are to be found at the molecular level, which at this time in the history of neurobiology means the the directions of the ‘plus’ and ‘minus’ ends of various cytoskeletal proteins, and the preferences of the motors that ride them in either direction. Like vertebrates, drosophila have axons that exclusively use plus-end-out microtubules. However, although their dendrites similarly are distinguished by the presence minus-end-out microtubules, one surprise was that almost all of their dendrites were this way. The kicker is that they start out with a even mix like vertebrates do, but over time somehow weed them out. An important element in any potential theory of neurons would be the role of the cell body (the nucleus, centriole and primary cilium) in the ongoing specification of the larger tree of axons and dendrites. A cell body that stands largely aloof from them, whether transiently or permanently, would appear to lose some of the authority it might have if interposed instead between them.The unique geometry of the pseudounipolar neurons of our dorsal root ganglion has been known for a while, but only more recently has the frequent presence of axons sprouting from dendrites in our hippocampus and cortex been appreciated. In seeking explanations for the structure of such neurons the influences of mitochondria in various states of performance and lifecycle should not be underestimated. In fact, mitochondria figure importantly in the entire evolutionary curiosity we have tried to lay out here. The same article above which stirred up question surrounding the primitive phylogeny of sponges also explored newly identified trends that emerge in looking at the sizes and contents of the genomes of mitochondria across metazoans—but that is probably a topic sufficient for another post. 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Fake degree row Surinder Singh meets police chief offers to surrender

first_imgSingh said he had appeared for examinations in 2009, 2010 and 2011 from Eiilm University, Sikkim, and was awarded a BA degree in 2012. He also admitted that there was a “typo” error in the affidavit even as his party alleged that police was targeting its leaders.The Delhi Cantt MLA, who met police commissioner BS Bassi along with senior party leader Sanjay Singh, said he also offered to “surrender” before the law enforcing agency in the case. “I showed him (Bassi) my documents. I also told him that I gave exams in  2009, 2010 and 2011 and the university came under the scanner in April, 2015. Why should I be blamed for it? This is a political conspiracy by my opponents. Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 crore“If police still think there is a need to arrest me, then I am available for it,” he said after meeting Bassi.Earlier in the day, Singh, a former NSG commando who combated terrorists during the 26/11 attack in Mumbai, addressed a news conference along with Sanjay Singh where they charged that the police was targeting AAP. Sanjay Singh said Surinder was a “victim” in the case and not an “offender”. “The Centre is trying to suppress AAP by arresting our leaders and MLAs. Narendra Modi had resorted to similar tactics in Gujarat. There are several FIRs registered against BJP leaders, but the police are showing promptness only in arresting Surinder Singh and AAP leaders.“In this case, Surinder Singh is a victim and not an offender. The university has issued degrees to thousands of students.  “If the university turns out to be dubious, then the MLA cannot be blamed for that,” Sanjay Singh said.last_img read more