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Diocese of San Joaquin cathedral welcomes new dean, ‘historic’ deacon…

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Pat McCaughanPosted Dec 3, 2018 People The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Very Rev. Ryan Newman, second row and right, was the first dean to be installed at Fresno’s St. James Cathedral in more than a decade. The altar party included, front row, Emily Cabbiness and Tony Alvarez. Also pictured, San Joaquin Bishop David Rice. Photo: Jeff March/Diocese of San Joaquin[Episcopal News Service] Diocese of San Joaquin Episcopalians gathered joyously Dec. 1 to welcome a new cathedral dean and to celebrate the first deacon ordinations at St. James Cathedral in Fresno, California, in at least a decade.“We’re calling it a diocesan day of celebration,” San Joaquin Bishop David Rice said. “In the morning we installed the Rev. Ryan D. Newman as cathedral dean, and in the afternoon, we ordained four new deacons.“That’s equally historic for this emerging diocese,” he said. “It’s a diaconate ordination in a place we haven’t had for 10 years, since the schism. And it’s historic that two of the deacons have come from our established school for deacons. This is the first group that has come through our own local process, and we’re delighted about that.”Episcopalians welcomed the Very Rev. Ryan Newman as the first dean of St. James Cathedral in Fresno in a decade on Dec. 1. Photo: Jeff March/Diocese of San JoaquinIn 2007, the former San Joaquin diocese broke away from the Episcopal Church over disagreements about the ordination of women and LGBTQ people, and same-gender blessings. Calling itself the Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin, the breakaway group attempted to keep the property, including the Fresno cathedral.Those who chose to remain in the Episcopal Church reconstituted the diocese. A series of court battles ensued and, according to Rice, all but one property has been returned to the Episcopal Church.Newman, a Southern California native, said he felt an immediate connection to the passion and energy of Rice, especially “when he told me that the diocese needs someone who’s not afraid to get messy and who likes to rebuild things.”Newman was the rector and headmaster of All Saints’ Church and School in Kaap’a, Kaua’i, in the Diocese of Hawaii, and had no thoughts of moving on – until San Joaquin Canon to the Ordinary Anna Carmichael called him.“I was in a Seattle airport, waiting for a flight,” Newman recalled. “I was on my way to walk the Camino de Santiago de Compostela. Ironically, I was preparing to walk the way of St. James. I thought my Camino would end in Spain. Little did I know the journey would take me to St. James in Fresno.”Newman, 42, hails from South Orange County in the Diocese of Los Angeles, and attended St. Margaret’s School in San Juan Capistrano. Ordained a priest in 2003, he served for 11 years as chaplain and director of operations at Campbell Hall a 1,000-student Episcopal school in North Hollywood, before moving to All Saints’, Kaua’i, a historic church he helped to regenerate.Now, he hopes to parlay that experience to St. James Cathedral in Fresno.“Bishop Rice wants to make it a place where it’s not just about worship on Sundays but about what happens between Sundays, about how we become the people of God and church in the world. It’s about getting out there and doing outreach and advocacy and community,” Newman told ENS.Newman also dreams of transforming the cathedral into a center for the arts and education and an “embodiment of this resurrection in the diocese.”‘Moments of resurrection with each passing day’Rice counts the Dec. 1 ordinations among “the moments of resurrection” the diocese experiences daily.“We started a school for deacons about three years ago, and that was a response to changing styles of formation and training,” he said. “We recognized the need for local formation and training in addition to those aspirants who choose to go to the Church Divinity School of the Pacific and other places.”Greg Masztal was ordained Dec. 1 and said becoming a deacon caught him by surprise. “I joined the church 5½ years ago and I didn’t see this happening, … but I am willing to see where I am led,” he told ENS recently.Currently, the full-time auditor serves the community of St. Paul’s, Modesto. “They’ve gone through a lot over the years, and now it’s a growing community,” Masztal said. “I hope to be a part of that and to encourage people, which is part of a deacon’s call.”Masztal, 60, added: “It’s been a long journey. I feel like I’m already doing it. And these ordinations are part of a great celebration that is happening.”Rice agreed. “We are a diocese that continues to experience moments of resurrection with each passing day.”Concluding the court battles represents a significant shift in the diocesan landscape, which will “be different from most dioceses,” he said.“We have concluded all of our litigations with the exception of one, a singular property, St. Columba’s in Fresno,” Rice said. “That case has been brought to the court, and we’re waiting to hear the results of that decision. We are finished after that.”Additionally, the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church has forgiven $6.8 million in loans to the diocese “and that is a gift for which we continue to be exceedingly grateful,” Rice said. “It allows us to continue and to move and emerge in ways we wouldn’t be able to otherwise.”San Joaquin Bishop David Rice ordains deacons for the first time in a decade at St. James Cathedral in Fresno. Kneeling from left, the new deacons are Marilee Muncey, Greg Masztal, Amy Larsen and Terrance Goodpasture. Photo: Jeff March/Diocese of San JoaquinAWE, holy candor, changing the landscapeDespite challenges, the San Joaquin Diocese is “in good heart,” and Rice sees a seismic shift in the landscape.There are numerous inquiries from across the church and around the country to fill upcoming vacancies from those wanting to experience the kind of “liturgical laboratory” represented by the rebuilding efforts.Increasingly, new relationships are being forged, from the voices of the homeless to nonprofit organizations, ecumenical partners and academic institutions.There are other shifts: “Rather than talking about average Sunday attendance, we are talking about AWE – average weekly engagement, an acronym coined by Canon to the Ordinary Anna Carmichael,” Rice said.“It is a commentary on how we emerge and continue to emerge and the larger liturgical work of people has everything to do with those with whom we spend time and how we serve them each day.”Rice cited as an example the number of feeding ministries in the diocese’s 21 worship communities. “What’s important about that is, the ministries have come about because our communities have engaged in conversations with people who live where they live, and they’ve heard expressions of ‘we don’t have food.’”There is HUB – Helping Urban Cyclists – which serves homeless residents by providing bicycles for transportation. There is a warming center for the homeless of Visalia. And there is a diocesan immigration task force “engaged in really substantive conversations about refugees and our sisters and brothers who have that status and how we can be of assistance and a voice where sometimes they are voiceless,” Rice said.“We believe the church has a clear mandate to be involved wherever people are marginalized or typically invisible.”The diocese still “travels light,” with minimal staff – and there are challenges. “We are endeavoring to address the things we know don’t work,” Rice said. “We use holy candor all the time. We are looking for builders who are building relationships, who are entrepreneurial, who are not risk-averse. It’s hard work, given the landscape.”Newman said that passion and energy and vision drew him back to California because Rice “is changing the metrics about vitality.”“It’s not just about how many butts in the pews, but how you’re engaging community in meaningful and tangible ways,” Newman said. “It’s the only way that this diocese and the individual congregations will succeed long term and have sustainability.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Diocese of San Joaquin cathedral welcomes new dean, ‘historic’ deacon ordinations Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Police and NSPCC partnership wins Link Award

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Police and NSPCC partnership wins Link Award AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 October 2005 | Newscenter_img Large charity Musgrave SuperValu-Centra NI collected this award, nominated by Action Cancer for its huge contribution of the Big Bus, costing £400,000. Medium charity winnerBank of Ireland won the medium charity category, after being proposed by Men Against Cancer. The bank helped fundraise for the first dedicated facility for men’s cancer in the UK or Ireland. The Department of Health has agreed to take on long-term responsibility for the unit at Belfast City Hospital, which deals mainly with testicular and prostrate cancer.Small charityBotanic Inns Ltd picked up the small charity award, on the nomination of NI Mother and Baby Action (NIMBA), the premature and vulnerable baby charity. Botanic’s ten outlets organised events including a chicken wing eating competition and bungee jumping.Award for innovationFundraising is only one of the ways organisations can help charities. Ben and Jerry’s Homemade Ltd, the ice-cream makers, was nominated by the Cresco Trust in Derry for providing mentored jobs and training for nine unemployed young people and for sharing their expertise to help give the Trust heightened credibility and increased professionalism.Award for challengePeople who have acquired aphasia due to stroke or head injuries – of whom there are more than 10,000 in Northern Ireland – have benefited from fundraising by Vodafone. The company was nominated by Speechmatters, which faces special challenges because aphasia is a little-known and understood disability.Award for clubs and societiesComber Rotary Club was nominated by the NI Music Therapy Trust for its help in extending therapy services to schools, centres and individuals who could not otherwise afford them. Extra fundraising money has allowed NIMT to set up a bursary scheme to encourage music graduates to train as music therapists.Award for schools and collegesThis new Link category was awarded to Dunluce School which has organised an annual cycle ride for pupils, past pupils and staff for many years, raising a total of £130,000 for the Ulster Cancer Foundation; in 2004 alone the school raised £6,500. The cycle ride also helps to raise awareness of cancer prevention among the pupils. Tagged with: Ireland The top Link Award has been presented to the Police Service of Northern Ireland for its fundraising achievements and support for NSPCC Northern Ireland. The Link Awards are organised by the Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action to recognise corporate support for the voluntary sector.The PSNI’s support for the NSPCC took the overall Link Award at the annual charity Oscars from celebrity Patrick Mower, who plays Rodney in Emmerdale. Nearly 150 abused children in Northern Ireland will receive advice and support to rebuild their lives, thanks to a huge fundraising effort by the police who smashed their target of £100,000 to raise £201,000. PSNI ran events throughout the year, including high-profile marathon runs in London and Belfast by the chief constable, Sir Hugh Orde, as well as sponsored slims, a dragon boat race and other events involving officers of all ranks and their families.Other winners in Link Award categories included: Advertisementlast_img read more

Coronavirus updates: Cases in Alabama county double in 2 weeks

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy JON HAWORTH and EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — The novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 610,000 people worldwide.Over 14.5 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.The United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 3.8 million diagnosed cases and at least 140,914 deaths.Here is how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern: 10:05 a.m.: NJ closing DMV center after employee tests positiveA DMV licensing center in Wayne, New Jersey, is closing for one week after an employee tested positive, state officials announced Tuesday.The facility will be sanitized and the employee will quarantine for two weeks.9:25 a.m.: Cases in Alabama county double in two weeksOfficials in Calhoun County, Alabama, about 70 miles east of Birmingham, are pleading with residents to wear masks as COVID-19 cases surge in the area. Of the county’s 814 coronavirus cases, 430 of those were reported in just the last two weeks, Michael Barton, director of Emergency Management for Calhoun County, said Monday.“This is alarming,” Barton said, adding that hospitals are at an “all-time high in reaching our capacity.” One local hospital had five COVID-19 patients two weeks ago. That hospital now has 44 patients.Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey issued a mandatory statewide mask requirement last week. “Make sure that you wear your mask and you adhere to all of the standards and guidelines that you possibly can,” urged Joe Weaver, CEO at the local Stringfellow Memorial Hospital. “We know it’s restrictive, but at the same time, there’s no other thing. There’s nothing else that we can do at this point in time.”4:43 a.m.: Russia’s first COVID-19 vaccine ready, deputy defense minister saysRussia’s first vaccine against the novel coronavirus infection, which was created by military specialists and scientists of the Gamaleya National Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology, is ready, First Deputy Defense Minister Ruslan Tsalikov told Argumenty i Fakty.“Final assessments on the results of testing by our specialists and scientists of the National Research Center have been already made. At the moment of release all volunteers without exception developed immunity against the coronavirus and felt normal. So, the first domestic vaccine against the novel coronavirus infection is ready,” Tsalikov told the newspaper.2:43 a.m.: Ft. Worth federal women’s prison announces third COVID-related deathThe U.S. Bureau of Prisons announced late Monday a third COVID-related death at FMC Carswell, a specialized federal medical prison for women in Ft. Worth, Texas.Teresa Ely, 51, tested positive for COVID-19 on June 30 and was transported to a local hospital where she received treatment until she died Monday, July 20.The BOP announcement said Ely had “long-term, pre-existing medical conditions, which the CDC lists as risk factors for developing more severe COVID-19 disease.”“Ms. Ely was a 51-year-old female who was sentenced in the Western District of Virginia to a 252-month sentence for Engaging in a Criminal Enterprise and Continuing a Criminal Enterprise,” read a statement from the prison. “Ms. Ely had been in custody at FMC Carswell since September 19, 2007.”1:37 a.m.: NFL players will be tested daily for COVID-19 for at least the first two weeks of training campThe NFL announced that players will be tested daily for the coronavirus for at least the first two weeks of training camp.The league also made an offer to the NFL Players Association to play no preseason games this summer, a source told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.The players had been pushing to not play preseason games this year, and the league had been seeking to play two games instead of the usual four.The league’s proposal to the players includes an offer for a longer training camp acclimation period, a source told ESPN’s Dan Graziano, and that is closer to what the union proposed.The NFLPA has not yet informed the league whether it will accept the proposal.12:45 a.m.: Church-related COVID-19 outbreaks continue to pop up in West VirginiaDuring Monday’s briefing, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice announced that several new church-related outbreaks of COVID-19 have been identified at places of worship in Grant, Logan and Wood counties.Last week, the governor announced that additional church-related outbreaks had already been identified in Boone, Kanawha, Raleigh and Taylor counties.Between all seven of these counties combined, these outbreaks account for about 75 total cases.“We’ve absolutely got to stay on top of this with all in us,” Gov. Justice said. “Please know that the church setting is the ideal setting to spread this virus.”The governor urged all West Virginians in church settings to follow the state’s safety guidelines, including using every other pew, maintaining social distancing, and wearing face coverings.“I know these things are really difficult to do,” Gov. Justice said. “But, for right now, they have to be done because, if we don’t, all we’re going to do is lose more people.”“We could very well lose a lot of our grandmothers and grandfathers – people who have so much wisdom to still continue to pass on – we absolutely don’t need to be losing these great West Virginians,” he said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Dixie State Men’s Basketball Visits No. 1 Gonzaga Tuesday

first_img Written by Brad James Tags: Dixie State men’s basketball/Gonzaga Men’s Basketball FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSPOKANE, Wash.-Tuesday, Dixie State men’s basketball (4-1, 0-0 in WAC play) faces No. 1 Gonzaga (7-0, 0-0 in WCC play).This historic game for the Trailblazers represents the first time they have faced the No. 1 team in the country, or any ranked team in the Top 25 for that matter.Dixie State head coach Jon Judkins is now only 10 wins short of surpassing former University of Utah women’s basketball head coach Elaine Elliott (582-234, .713) for the most wins in Utah college basketball history.Judkins has won 573 games as the head coach at Snow College and Dixie State University.Dixie State averages 80.2 points per game, tying the Trailblazers for 70th place nationally with UC Davis and UNC Wilmington.Defensively, Dixie State surrenders 69 points per game, ranking the Trailblazers 159th nationally in scoring defense.For the Trailblazers, junior forward Jacob Nicolds leads the squad in points (13.4) and rebounds (6.8) per game.Also scoring in double figures on-average for Dixie State are sophomore guard/forward Frank Staine (12.4 points per game, a team-best 10 steals), junior guard Cameron Gooden (12.2 points per game, a team-best 19 assists) and sophomore guard Isaiah Pope (11.5 points per game).The Trailblazers’ blocked shots leader is senior guard Dason Youngblood, who has 4.Gonzaga scores 94.3 points per game, ranking the Bulldogs third nationally in scoring offense.The only more prolific scoring offenses in men’s college basketball belong to Coastal Carolina (96.1 points per game) and Iowa (95.1 points per game).Defensively, Gonzaga surrenders 74.4 points per game, tying them for 247th nationally with Central Michigan.Symmetrically, the Bulldogs are led by senior forward Corey Kispert and sophomore forward Drew Timme, each of whom average 20.6 points per game.Further symmetry exists for Gonzaga as Timme and French national, redshirt junior guard Joel Ayayi, each average 7.4 rebounds per contest to lead the squad.Freshman guard Jalen Suggs (15.1 points per game, team bests in assists [41] and steals [18]) and Ayayi (10.4 points per game) also score in double figures on-average for the Bulldogs.Sophomore forward Anton Watson leads Gonzaga with 8 blocked shots on the season.The Bulldogs are coached by Mark Few, who is 607-124 (.830) in his 22nd season at the helm of the Gonzaga program. December 29, 2020 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Men’s Basketball Visits No. 1 Gonzaga Tuesdaylast_img read more

Law enabling tenants to take landlords to court over low-quality homes get Royal Assent

first_imgHome » News » Law enabling tenants to take landlords to court over low-quality homes get Royal Assent previous nextRegulation & LawLaw enabling tenants to take landlords to court over low-quality homes get Royal AssentLegislation sponsored by Labour MP Karen Buck now set to come into force in late March after passing final parliamentary hurdle.Nigel Lewis21st December 20181 Comment1,975 Views A Private Members Bill that will enable tenants to sue rogue landlords if their homes are not fit for human habitation has received Royal Assent and will become law in three months’ time.The new legislation has come about through the tireless work of Labour MP for Westminster North Karen Buck supported by Lord Best in the Lords. In a tweet yesterday, she also thanked campaigning groups Shelter and Generation Rent for their support.The government backed Buck’s bill during its more recent passage through parliament and has described its entry onto the state book as a ‘landmark’ moment for the rented sector.It has been a long road for the bill, which was initially introduced in 2015 and endured several false starts in parliament until the current government gave reform of the ‘broken’ housing sector high priority.“Everyone deserves a safe and decent place to live, regardless of whether you own your home or rent it,” says housing minister Heather Wheeler (left).“This new law is a further step to ensure that tenants have the decent homes they deserve.”Once in force the legislation will give tenants the right to take legal action in the courts for breach of contract if a property is not fit for human habitation.The Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act amends the relevant sections of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985, updating the ‘fit for human habitation’ test, but it only applies to England.The Landlord and Tenancy Act had become hopelessly out of date on many levels and, for example, only applied to homes rented out for £52 or less, and £80 in London.Fitness for human consumption covers a range of basic standards including repairs, freedom from damp, natural light, ventilation, drainage, and both toilet and cooking facilities.Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act heather wheeler Karen Buck December 21, 2018Nigel LewisOne commentRobert Corley, Gigabyte Software Gigabyte Software 23rd December 2018 at 6:31 pmThis is great news for renters. We need to ensure that are not just maximising a single metric, like the number of houses, while ignoring whether or not those homes actually provide sufficient habitation for a net positive impact of the lives of the people living in them.This piece of legislation allows the individuals the power to act when this is not the case, but also allows the government to gather statistics about the habitability of housing in the PRS.Well done to Karen and all the civil servants involved!Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Attorney General Curtis Hill Joins Other States In Urging U.S. Supreme Court To Protect…

first_img Attorney General Curtis Hill, as part of a 22-state coalition, is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to protect the practice of lawmaker-led prayer at public meetings.The coalition filed a brief Wednesday afternoon asking the Supreme Court to hear arguments and confirm the constitutionality of the practice following an adverse ruling by a federal appeals court stemming from a North Carolina case. A follow-up ruling by the Supreme Court would clear confusion among the lower courts and, the coalition hopes, strike down the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling, which could negatively affect free exercise of religion in Indiana and other states.“The First Amendment was never intended to prohibit elected officials from praying aloud at official government functions,” Attorney General Hill said. “Our tradition of liberty in America has always promoted and protected the free exercise of religion rather than stifle it.”The coalition argues that lawmaker-led prayer is woven into the fabric of American society and is fully consistent with the Constitution. The coalition notes that non-coercive expressions of faith in the public sector have long characterized official public proceedings in the United States. The brief further cites numerous examples nationwide of states, counties and municipalities that open meetings with prayers by government officials.The North Carolina case, Lund vs. Rowan County, focuses on a tradition among county commissioners of opening meetings with prayers offered by one of the commissioners. The coalition’s friend-of-the-court brief is filed in support of Rowan County.Indiana filed its brief in support of free expression of faith along with West Virginia, Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin, along with the Governor of Kentucky.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Bayfront Homeowners Prep for “Rocking” Night in Venice Celebration

first_imgBy Donald WittkowskiLadies and gentlemen, step right up! Sue Hornyak is transforming her Ocean City bayfront home on North Point Road into the “Big Top,” a circus-sized tribute to Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey.A few doors down on North Point Road, Suzy Dolaway’s bayfront house will become a giant, disco-themed party featuring the quintessential silver dance ball and lava lamps. Groovy, baby, groovy.On Bay Avenue, the folks at the Ocean City Yacht Club will suddenly find themselves partying at the “Ocean City Rock Club” as part of a rock-and-roll-themed makeover of the typically more sedate historic boathouse.All this revelry is inspired by Ocean City’s Night in Venice, the spectacular annual boat parade that unfolds along the back bays between the Ocean City-Longport Bridge and Tennessee Avenue amid colorfully decorated homes and huge crowds.The 63rd annual edition of Night in Venice is scheduled to get underway Saturday at 6 p.m., led by grand marshal Alfonso Ribeiro, the new host of “America’s Funniest Home Videos” and a former star of the 1990s sitcom “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air.”On Saturday night, the picturesque bayfront will come alive with the Night in Venice boat parade, colorfully decorated homes and huge crowds.This year, Night in Venice will boast a “Rockin’ Through the Decades” musical theme. City spokesman Doug Bergen said an estimated 50,000 spectators will be in town to marvel over what is Ocean City’s largest summer event. A fireworks display after the boat parade will cap off the festivities.Members of Sue Hornyak’s family have come from parts of New Jersey and Pennsylvania to her house at 265 North Point Road for what has become a grand, annual celebration featuring over-the-top decorations and themes.Hornyak said her house has won prizes four years in a row for its elaborate decorations, giving her family a virtual Night in Venice dynasty. In 2015, the Hornyak family got decked out in Great Gatsby costumes and followed up last year with a comic book-style Superheroes theme.On Saturday, Hornyak is turning her home into the “Big Top,” as she pays her last respects to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, which faded into history this year. There will be clowns, tightrope walkers and cardboard cutouts of circus animals.“I’m going to decorate the outside of the house like a circus,” Hornyak said. “The goal is to make it look like the Big Top. We are saying farewell to Ringling Bros. I enjoyed the circus, and it’s a little sad to hear that Ringling Bros. has ended.”Sue Hornyak, third from left, and members of her family show off some of the circus-themed decorations at their home.Her oldest son, George Hornyak, will play the featured role as the costumed ring master. But this weekend promises to be even bigger for George and his pregnant wife, Lauren. They were planning Friday to announce the gender of their unborn child to the entire family.Sue Hornyak said the gender-reveal party, coupled with the Night in Venice festivities, promises to make the entire weekend particularly special. Night in Venice has been a tradition for her family for 13 years.“We all put a lot of effort into it to make it a fun night,” Hornyak said.Suzy Dolaway, one Hornyak’s neighbors, is also getting ready for Night in Venice, a tradition for her family as well. This year, Dolaway plans to have about 125 friends and family members at her house at 231 North Point Road for a 1970s-style disco party featuring live music.“The theme will be ‘Disco on the Dock,’’’ Dolaway said, noting that the decorations will include a silver disco dance ball hanging over the center deck, lava lamps on the tables and tiny, foil-like fringes.“You can say, ‘Groovy,’” Dolaway said, laughing, about the lava lamps.A few blocks away from North Point Road, members of the Ocean City Yacht Club at 100 Bay Ave. were preparing to convert the 116-year-old boating haven into the “Ocean City Rock Club” to celebrate Night in Venice.Three big bedsheets that have been turned into rock-and-roll-themed banners will be unfurled on the yacht club’s bayside for everyone in the boat parade to see, said Kathryn Doms, who serves as the club’s rear commodore.At the Ocean City Yacht Club, member Faith Camp-O’Donnell, left, and Kathryn Doms, who serves as rear commodore, unfurl an “Ocean City Rock Club” banner that will be on display for the rock-themed Night in Venice celebration.The celebration was scheduled to begin Friday night for what the yacht club calls its annual Junior Night in Venice. It is a flotilla of decorated sailboats, piloted by dozens of children, that is showered with candy thrown from people at lagoon-front homes.“They actually take fishing nets,” Doms explained of how the children catch the candy.On Saturday morning, members of the yacht club will scramble to put the finishing touches on the boathouse to have it fully decorated for Night in Venice, Doms said.“Everyone arrives at 9 a.m. It’s fun to do it at the last minute because everyone works so well together to get it done,” she said. Getting ready with their circus costumes for Night in Venice are Sue Hornyak, left, her son, George, his wife, Lauren, and Tommy Jackson, the son of Hornyak’s niece.last_img read more

They Call Me Q Opens Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments They Call Me Q is the story of a girl from Bombay growing up in the Boogie Down Bronx who seeks balance between the cultural pressures brought forth by her traditional parents and wanting acceptance into her new culture. Along the journey, Kadwani transforms into 13 characters that have shaped her life including her parents, Caucasian teachers, Puerto Rican classmates and African-American friends. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 7, 2014 Directed by Obaid Kadwani and Claudia Gaspar, the production was developed with Ellery Schaar. The play debuted in 2012 at Variations Theatre Group and went on to play Chicago, Montreal, Washington D.C., Nashville, Orlando and Hawaii. They Call Me Q They Call Me Q celebrates its off-Broadway opening on June 4 at St. Luke’s Theatre. The emotionally charged comedy is written and performed by Qurrat Ann Kadwani.last_img read more

OpenMic entertains, educates

first_img continue reading » 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr When you tune into GTE Financial Credit Union’s OpenMic on YouTube, you’ll find employees chatting about credit basics and the home-buying process, sharing tips on completing a scholarship application—and nailing a mannequin challenge and the Harlem Shake.This combination of financial education and employees having a good time is intended to “put a face to a name” of credit union staff engaging members and prospective members via their favorite social media channels, says Brian Best, president/CEO of the $1.9 billion Tampa, Fla., GTE Financial credit union.Online videos developed by GTE Financial CU’s internal marketing team are also posted to Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.“Overall, our social media strategy is to communicate with our members instantly and efficiently, while creating positive brand recognition,” Best says. “Our social media channels, especially Facebook and YouTube, are used so frequently, and by such a wide demographic, it would be unfortunate to overlook such a valuable channel.”last_img read more

Fire Kills Woman, 90, in Sayville

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A fire killed a 90-year-old woman inside her unit at a retirement community in Sayville early Sunday morning, Suffolk County police said.After the fire was extinguished, first responders found Elizabeth Sclafani’s body inside her home, police said. Sclafani was already dead by the time they reached her, police said.The 4 a.m. fire destroyed a neighboring residence, which was vacant at the time, and damaged another unit, police said.Authorities said that half a dozen fire departments responded to battle the blaze. A Sayville firefighter was hospitalized for minor injuries, police said.After a preliminary investigation, detectives believe the origin of the fire was non-criminal, police said.last_img read more