Tag: Joelo

5 custom motorcycles that will make you sweat: March 2014

first_imgThe birds have begun to sing. The snow has begun to melt. And before you know it, we’ll have escaped this god-forsaken tundra and be on to warmer pastures – and that means it’s nearly time to get back on two wheels, and out on some delicious twisties. To get your fired up about the 2014 riding season, here is this month’s batch of the latest and greatest custom bikes from around the world.Kawasaki 750: “Kamikaze”With a name like Kamikaze, it better be mean. And this green machine from German bike builder Tobias Guckel delivers on all fronts. Built on the frame of a Kawasaki H1, the Kamikaze packs a ballsy 748cc-two-stroke motor stolen from a Kawasaki H2. It also features Mikuni TM34 carbs, a custom exhaust from Jolly Moto, and a modern suspension to make sure you can handle even the fiercest turns without committing suicide.See more at BikeEXIF.Lotus C-01There’s a good reason the crazy-stylish Lotus C-01 reminds you of the Lightcycle from Tron:Legacy: The same guy, Daniel Simon, designed both. But unlike the Lightcycle, this sexy beast isn’t a work of science fiction. Custom built from the rubber up, the C-01 is powered by a 1,195cc 75-degree short-stroke V-Twin that’s capable of pumping out more than 180 horsepower. (Don’t worry, it has the brakes to match.) The body is made from carbon fiber, and the frame is constructed from carbon fiber, titanium, and aerospace-quality steel. Unfortunately for us, only 100 of these puppies will ever be made – and they won’t come cheap. If you’re thinking of getting one, it might be time to consider a second mortgage.See more at Digital Trends.Laverda SF 750: Monkee #59Back on planet Earth, the Copenhagen-based designers at Wrenchmonkees have given the Italian classic Laverda SF 750 a 21st century overhaul, with a cleaned up frame, monoshock-dampered swingarm, Motocicli Veloci clip-on handlebars, and custom aluminum tank, front fender, and more one-of-a-kind details. While this beaut’ has already been picked up by another biker, we can promise Wrenchmonkees will stay on our radar for the next custom build.See more at Wrenchmonkees.Drysdale 1000 V8What do you get when you combine the style of a Moto Guzzi, 16-vale cylinder heads from a Yamaha FZR600, and the nutty design ambitions of Australian bike builder Ian Drysdale? The Drysdale 1000 V8, that’s what. Capable of generating 150 horsepower, this monster of a bike is a bit of a Frankenstein creation, with forks, brakes, and wheels from a Yamaha R1, a swingarm from a Kawasaki ZZ-R1100, and a custom-built 4-into-1 exhaust that’s hidden under the seat. The bike you see here has already been sold – for a cold $100,000 – but Drysdale says he plans to create a total of five, in case you’re crazy enough to want to get on this heavy metal hell-raiser.See more at The Kneeslider.Yamaha ’79 SR500Yes, I included a Yamaha SR500 in last month’s list. But I couldn’t help myself when I spotted this chromed-out custom looker from UK designers Volts Mechanix. Every pipe, nut, nook, and cranny on this Yamaha single-cylinder thumper has been gone over with a fine-tooth comb. Built for tooling around town, Volts Mechanix’s SR500 is sure to look good wherever you take it. In fact, it’s so pretty to look at, you might never make it on the bike.See more at Pipe Burn. Editors’ Recommendations The Big List of Brands with Lifetime Warranties: Buy It Once, Have It Forever Stirred or Shaken? How to Make a Perfect Vodka Martini A Beginner’s Guide to Road Biking 15 Best Subscription Boxes for Men Who Love Gifts Indian Motorcycle’s 2020 Scout Lineup Pays Homage to Its 100-Year Legacy last_img read more

Canadian energy company named in California climaterelated lawsuit

A Canadian energy company is named in three large lawsuits that attempt to link damages from climate change to industry’s alleged attempts to hinder action to address it.In the latest of a growing number of such lawsuits around the world, Calgary-based Encana is one of 20 energy majors and their subsidiaries facing claims from three California communities. They allege the companies have deliberately sown misinformation and doubt on climate change and are at least partially responsible for related damages such as shoreline erosion.“Defendants … have known for nearly a half century that unrestricted production and use of their fossil fuel products create greenhouse gas pollution that warms the planet and changes our climate,” says the lawsuit filed by the City of Imperial Beach.“They have nevertheless engaged in a co-ordinated, multi-front effort to conceal and deny their own knowledge of those threats, discredit the growing body of publicly available scientific evidence, and persistently create doubt in the minds of customers, consumers, regulators, the media, journalists, teachers, and the public about the reality and consequences of the impacts of their fossil fuel pollution.”Encana (TSX:ECA) has not responded to requests for comment.The lawsuits, filed Monday in California, draw on legal precedents used against tobacco companies, which reached a U.S. settlement of $368.5 billion in 1998.“The plaintiffs have an uphill battle, but these are plausible claims,” said Michael Burger, director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School.Burger said that, like tobacco companies, the energy industry knew its business was creating problems. Reports quoting documents from Exxon’s archives suggest its management was told by its own scientists about greenhouse gases and climate change as early as 1977.Instead of addressing the problem, the lawsuits allege, industry deployed think tanks, lobbyists and other means to obscure the science and resist regulation — much like the tobacco industry.“You have a similar history of corporate malfeasance,” said Burger.But the climate lawsuits will have a much tougher time linking specific damages to industry actions, he said.“To get from pulling it out of the ground all the way through the chain of manufacture, marketing, combustion — and through the climate change reality and then to sea-level rise causing specific impacts in these places — is a much longer chain of causation.”Similar lawsuits have been thrown out.Vic Sher, the lawyer handling the litigation, said his lawsuits avoid conflicts with federal law that disallowed earlier attempts.Fresh reports have made industry attempts to block change much clearer, he said. As well, research now allows scientists to make direct links between greenhouse gases, sea-level rise and individual producers.“That causal connection we can now tie to particular companies.”The claim alleges the defendants are collectively behind about 20 per cent of total CO2 emissions between 1965 and 2015.“It’s an enormous volume and a substantial contribution to the problem,” Sher said.Kate Sears, supervisor for Marin County just north of San Francisco, said her communities are already suffering.Previously rare flooding tides now occur about 15 times a year, she said. The only roads in and out for some coastal communities have been submerged.A county assessment concluded in April that within 15 years, tidal flooding could threaten at least $15.5 billion in public and private assets, from homes to schools to wetlands.“Climate change is not a theoretical problem for us,” Sears said. “It’s very, very real.”Martin Olszynski, a University of Calgary law professor who has published research on similarities between climate change and tobacco liability, said the cases are highly relevant to Canada as different court systems try to deal with the issue.“Everyone’s watching to see what different courts are doing, especially countries that share that common law tradition,” he said. “There’s a cumulative effect — you start to see more and more of these.”A report in March for the United Nations counted 654 cases in 24 countries that dealt with the science of climate change and mitigation efforts.— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960 read more