Tesla Model 3 Alerts For Car Stoppage Ahead Prevents Possible Accident

TESLA MODEL 3 PERFORMANCE Tesla Model X Sees Two Vehicles Ahead In Automatic Braking Test – Video Source: Electric Vehicle News This Video Reveals What Tesla Autopilot Actually Sees 10 photos This owner’s Tesla Model 3 alerted him of a potential accident two car lengths ahead.This new Tesla Model 3 owner took to Reddit to explain a recent situation involving his car’s safety features. The car in question is a single-motor Model 3 Long Range without Tesla Autopilot, and he’s only owned it for a few weeks, so he’s not yet fully aware of all of its features. While he plans to get Autopilot down the road, he hasn’t opted for the technology yet. Nonetheless, the car may have saved him from a collision.Other Tesla Stories: 33 photos With New Update, Tesla Autopilot Seems Vastly Improved On Curvy Roads Reddit user u/ihatevideogames shared:So I was driving about 45mph on my way home tonight and I heard a really loud series of beeps that I’ve never heard before, almost like an emergency sound, I looked on the screen and see a car 2 cars ahead of me that’s red colored, instantly I think there’s an accident in front of me. As I brake and inch closer, indeed a car a few cars ahead of me stopped on the road dead in its tracks for no reason, it wasn’t an accident but the car just stopped and obviously made other cars brake, myself included.We’ve known for some time that Tesla Autopilot “sees” cars ahead of the car you’re following. We’re also aware of the technology’s alerts. The interesting part here is that the car alerted the driver and even though it doesn’t have Autopilot. This makes sense since Autopilot is always watching and engaged behind the scenes, even if the car doesn’t have the system activated (more on that below). It’s fantastic, however, that it made the driver aware of the stoppage. Cars suddenly stopping like this tend to cause an abundance of collisions and even multi-car pileups.The Model 3 just received a 5-Star safety rating from the NHTSA, with five stars in all categories. In addition, the Model 3 comes equipped with every NHTSA-recommend safety technology as standard, so you don’t have to opt for available equipment to get features like forward collision warning. CEO Musk has said all along that the car would be one of the safest on the road. Add in features like the one explained above and we’ve got a true winner here!There’s a wealth of information about this in the related Reddit thread. Follow the link below to check it out.Source: RedditTESLA MODEL 3 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 20, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

Nissan LEAF Holds More Banana Boxes Than Jaguar IPACE Video

first_imgResults:Nissan e-NV200: 50/50Model X 5 seater: 10+1/28Model S pre-facelift: 8+2/24Model X 6 seater: 9+1/23Kia e-Niro: 8/22Model S facelift: 8/22Nissan Leaf 2018: 7/21Kia Soul EV: 6/21Jaguar I-pace: 6/20Hyundai Ioniq: 6/18Nissan Leaf 2013: 5/18Opel Ampera-e: 5/17VW e-Golf: 5/16Hyundai Kona: 5/16VW e-up: 4/14BMW i3: 4/14 Simply amazing space.According to Bjørn Nyland’s latest banana box test of the Nissan LEAF, the second generation model is way more useful with cargo space way better than the average EV.LEAF stored 7 banana boxes (21 with folded seats), which is 2 more (3 more with folded seats) than the previous generation and more than Jaguar I-PACE (6/20 boxes), which aspires to be almost an SUV. The only non-Tesla passenger car better than the LEAF is Kia e-Niro (8/22 boxes).Nissan LEAF Source: Electric Vehicle News 2018 Nissan LEAF Battery Health Tested After 12,000 Miles 60 kWh Nissan LEAF Still Lacks Liquid Cooling: Report Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 1, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News UPDATE Video: Nissan LEAF Rapidgate No Longer A Problem?last_img read more

China slashes EV subsidies electric automaker shares fall

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicles Magazine Source: Bloomberg China has announced substantial cuts to existing subsidies for EV purchases. The subsidy for pure EVs with ranges of 400 kilometers (250 miles) and above will be halved, to 25,000 yuan ($3,700) per vehicle, the Chinese Ministry of Finance said (via Bloomberg). The minimum range to qualify for any subsidy will also be raised from 150 km to 250 km.The government warned late last year that it would reduce the subsidies in 2019, and phase them out completely after 2020, citing concerns that automakers’ reliance on subsidies has made them slow to develop new technologies and better vehicles. However, the recently announced cuts were deeper than expected, which caused share prices of Chinese EV manufacturers to falter.Shares of EV brand BAIC BluePark fell as much as 3.5 percent on the Shanghai exchange following the announcement. BYD, China’s largest seller of new energy vehicles (and a manufacturer of electric buses for the US market), dropped by 4 percent on the Hong Kong exchange.In response to the news, BAIC BluePark said that it may raise vehicle prices. BYD, however, says it’s prepared to adapt to the new market conditions, and that manufacturing scale and an edge in technology make it resistant to risk.US-listed ADRs for EV startup NIO, one of the few Chinese EV firms that US investors can easily invest in, plunged as much as 5.4 percent, the lowest intraday price since the Shanghai-based company’s September IPO.“While the incumbent OEMs will see some earnings damage, we consider NIO the most vulnerable of all,” wrote Bernstein Analyst Robin Zhu. “Despite struggling for demand, the company recently indicated it won’t reduce prices to offset lower EV subsidies. Today’s subsidy cuts mean NIO’s cars just got meaningfully more expensive for consumers.”The finance ministry is also encouraging Chinese cities and provinces to abolish subsidies on purchases of EVs, including buses and trucks, after a three-month grace period. The elimination of incentives from local governments, combined with the announced cuts in federal subsidies, will result in a total reduction of about 67 percent, Jefferies Analyst Patrick Yuan told Bloomberg – a far more drastic cut than the 40 or 50 percent the stock market was expecting.last_img read more

Should sport be played on Christmas Day

first_imgSportblog Share on Twitter | Pick John Amaechi and the Rt Reverend Stephen Lowe discuss whether sporting events should take place on Christmas Day Report Reply Share on Facebook | Pick Reply Shares00 Reply Facebook Since you’re here… Reply Twitter 0 1 24 Dec 2008 22:18 Share on Messenger 0 1 Facebook CuthbertB Twitter Facebook Share on Pinterest Reply Facebook Facebook Twitter Reply Twitter 26 Dec 2008 2:02 Reply Share 0 1 Facebook Share on Twitter 26 Dec 2008 8:37 0 1 Share on WhatsApp Email (optional) Tue 23 Dec 2008 19.01 EST 24 Dec 2008 18:35 Share on Facebook MarcelaProust Share on Facebook Report Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Share Many people already have to work on Christmas Day (emergency services, supermarket staff, filling station staff) so the ‘no’ argument is a bit pants. I imagine there are plenty of people who would jump at the chance to get away from their family for a few hours on Christmas Day.BTW, what has prompted this blog topic? I cant remember seeing anyone calling for sporting events to be played on Christmas Day. Share on Facebook | Pick Twitter Share on Twitter Facebook donwendyagain | Pick Share Zealous 0 1 Twitter First published on Tue 23 Dec 2008 19.01 EST Share on Twitter Report Share on Facebook Order by oldest Share on Facebook AHVarga Share on Twitter | Pick | Pick Share on LinkedIn Share Bloody silly idea. And since when has the idea that “because the NBA do” ever been the basis for an argument? mind you, if Benitez buys any more turkeys like Keane…… 25 Dec 2008 20:50 Share on Twitter 0 1 Come on guys, the festive period already has a special day set aside for sport.The clue is in the name FFS … Boxing Day? sleepwalkers Twitter Reply | Pick 0 1 Share on Twitter Loading comments… Trouble loading? Report Rugby used to be played on Christmas Day, Halifax would play Huddersfield on Christmas Day then play a return fixture on Boxing Day Share on Facebook Twitter Report Fancy that! … Someone with ‘Rt Reverend’ infront of their name being opposed to sport being played on the baby Jesus’s birthday. Who’d’a’thunk it?The thing is that it’s not just the highly paid professional sportsmen who would have to ‘work’ on Christmas Day (I understand that most footballers already ‘work’ or at least turn in to work on Christmas Day anyway), it’s the hundreds of ancilliary staff who work at the stadiums who would be dragged away from their families who would be getting the shitty end of the stick.But I suppose that the main reason why we will never see football matches played on Christmas Day anymore is because Police forces all around the country are already required to do compulsory overtime. For example, I happen to know that if you work for Merseyside Police then you can expect to get Christmas Day off once every five years. Report Comments 20 JoeyRDFC Reply Share on Facebook Share The low point of human civilisation – watching Eurosport on Christmas day. Facebook 24 Dec 2008 17:31 Share Reason (optional) Report sacface77 24 Dec 2008 18:18 Facebook Report Share on Facebook Reply Share on Facebook newest NoChristmas Day is for families. We have Boxing Day for our festive football. Share on Twitter Reply Share Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment GenghisCohen oldest 25 Share Seagulljavea amancalledmikey 25 Dec 2008 14:04 Twitter Twitter natbankofuganda collapsed I don’t see how anyone would get to the ground on Christmas day. The busses aren’t running and I’m usually pissed by lunchtime. Sounds like a disaster waiting to happen. | Pick Facebook Threads collapsed Share on Twitter Share Steffy Facebook Sport Facebook | Pick 24 Dec 2008 19:26 24 Dec 2008 18:38 Don’t see why not. Probably not a particularly good business decision though, there’s probably a lack of viewers. Reply Sportblog Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Reportcenter_img 0 1 Reply Share OF CORSE FOOTBALL SHOULD BE PLAYED ON CHRISTMAS DAY HOW ELSE WILL WE BE ABLE TO GET OUT OF THE KITCHEN AND SIT DOWN!! IVE BEEN COOKING AND WRAPPING GIFTS FOR THE KIDS AND THEY WANT TO PLAY WITH THE NEW TOYS THEY DONT NEED MOM IN THERE WITH THEM AND MOM WOULD REALLY LIKE TO HAVE A GOOD REASON TO SIT DOWN NOW FOR A FEW HOURS BEFORE I MUST START CLEANING UP ALL THE MESS SO GIVE ME A FOOTBALL BREAK PLEASE!!! I LOVE FOOTBALL AND IM TIRED!! IVE BEEN A GOOD MOMMA ALL YEAR LONG AND I ONLY ASK FOR A BREAK FOR CHRISTMAS DAY—SO HOW ABOUT IT!! MAKES A GREAT REASON TO QUIETLY SIT, EAT,AND DRINK RELAX AND ENJOY IT YOURSELF FOR A FEW HOURS LET THE KIDS FIGHT OVER THE NEW TOYS FOR AWHILE THEN CLEAN UP THE MESS AND GO TO BED NOW THATS WHAT THIS MOM CALLS A MERRY CHRISTMAS!!! Reuse this content,View all comments > 0 1 Reply Share on Facebook 24 Dec 2008 18:13 Share Twitter Share on Facebook I am an expat Brit living in the USA.To me, this is a country dependent thing. In the USA Boxing Day is just a normal working day (a lot of Americans have never heard the name and have no concept of “Boxing Day”) so the majority would not be able to watch daytime matches either in person or on TV. Also there is a large non Christian minority (a lot of Jews especially) so even saying “Merry Christmas” causes offense! (The P.C. term is “Happy Holidays” – which I hate!). Therefore there are a large number of people for whom working on Christmas Day represents no sacrifice whatsoever. I am sure it is a sacrifice for the players themselves but, to be quite honest, when you are being paid several million $$$ a year you should not complain that much about it.In England the situation is different. Boxing Day IS a bank holiday and has a long tradition of sporting fixtures. I don’t know that there is a whole lot to be gained by having sporting events on Christmas Day as well. Report Sport Report joe5000 0 1 Report Yaotzin 27 Dec 2008 1:19 0 1 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Reply Should sport be played on Christmas Day? 24 Dec 2008 17:41 | Pick Report 0 1 Twitter Reply Brondesboy View more comments Facebook 24 Dec 2008 16:30 unthreaded Reply Not sure about the ‘no’ argument here – I’m pretty sure some police officers have to work on Christmas Day whether there’s sport on or not. Also, seeing as he’s a Bishop, don’t you think he could have pushed the ‘go to church’ idea a bit harder? Reply Report Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share comments (20)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Share MarcelaProust | Pick 24 Dec 2008 18:49 Its a great idea. Surely its fairer for the players playing on Xmas Day than just loafing around training, not getting involved in festivities. An early afternoon kick-off (12 is preferable) will enable them to have a drink, a decent Xmas meal, and socialise with their families in the evening – without having to worry about a Boxing Day game. Noon kick-offs will enable fans to go to the match and return home just in time for the Queens’ Speech. As the Xmas fixture computer should help ensure local derbies – this is nothing more than going out for a pre-Xmas lunch pint for many fans.Just one problem. There’s nothing more to ruin your Xmas than seeing your team smashed 4-0 at home… Report Report Facebook 25 Dec 2008 22:58 50 Twitter It’s only a matter of time. There’s an obvious revenue opportunity there for broadcasters, so it’s pretty much a sure thing. | Pick Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other | Pick Facebook Historically it has already been done, in the fifties, I believe. I was looking back at some Brighton fixtures and noticed that they played Fulham on Christmas Day with the return fixture on Boxing Day. Players today, they don’t know they’re born! Share on Facebook Share via Email Reply YesJohn Amaechi, NBA basketball player turned broadcasterI don’t see why it shouldn’t be. I’ve played in the Christmas games in the NBA in the United States and I don’t particularly see why it would be a controversial subject. Of course, it’s not nice for the players sometimes. It took me away from my family and I only ever played away games over Christmas. That meant I had a sort-of “team” Christmas rather than a family one. But players adapt — you just move the day that you celebrate with your loved ones to either the day before or Boxing Day. In the States there are many sporting events that take place on days that are deemed special in one way or another. On Christmas Day there are NBA games, and sometimes if the fixtures fall that way you have football — NFL — games as well. Over New Year there are college football games, while Thanksgiving sees another round in the NFL programme. The reason for the scheduling is that, in the US, sport is about entertainment and spectacle as much as sporting endeavour. So the games are not being played simply to fit them in and ensure the result can be recorded, they are being played to entertain people, and arguably that is what people want over Christmas.This year there are a greater number of games on 25 December than there have been in recent years — five, compared with only one a couple of years ago. If the TV companies want to schedule more games, it suggests that the demand is there from the fans. What are you going to do on Christmas Day if you aren’t going out or going to a game? I suppose you can watch another James Bond rerun, or Mary Poppins — or you can watch your team play in a basketball game.Personally I’d probably watch Mary Poppins, but it’s horses for courses.It’s too cold to do much outside on Christmas and the games I remember playing in were certainly well attended; it was almost seen as a special treat to go to the game. In fact, many of these games are packed.I’m not saying playing sport on Christmas Day is a good or bad idea; it’s just the way that it is. It’s very simple: those people who don’t want to watch the game, either at the venue or on television, don’t have to but those who do have the opportunity.It doesn’t take up the whole day, just a couple of hours in the morning or evening. And there have been a lot of changes in how we live our lives; for example, we now shop on a Sunday and that isn’t thought of as unusual. Sport is not necessarily secular, but there are many different people around the world who have different special days and sport is a worldwide phenomenon. I think a lot of people do enjoy going to the game on Christmas Day.NoRt Reverend Stephen Lowe, Bishop of Hulme and Manchester City fanAs it happens, I don’t think there would be a huge demand from people to go and watch sporting events on Christmas Day. People still want it as a time set aside for family and that’s exactly how it should be. And remember, it’s not just the families of fans who would be adversely affected by sporting fixtures on Christmas Day. It would be a terrible shame if people felt compelled to work at what should be a special time because of a football game or other event. Players, the police and media — not to mention their families — would all suffer if they were forced to spend time apart from their loved ones. It’s the bystanders, if you like, that would be the victims. Everyone in professional sport would effectively have to give up Christmas Day and there is just no need to do that. Then, of course, there are logistical problems too. Public transport doesn’t run on Christmas Day and there could well be problems getting the required levels of policing that are needed for a major event together. Factors such as that bring in a whole new raft of issues that would need addressing.There is an argument that sport would bring people together on Christmas Day. Unfortunately, that isn’t true if people have to go to the pub or a football stadium to watch a game. That involves them leaving home, where they can build important relationships. I’m thinking particularly of families with children, who need that time and attention. There’s nothing wrong with sporting occasions over the festive period in general. Boxing Day has always been a traditional time to go and watch football and I think people can cope with that. I’m going to see football myself on Boxing Day: I’m a Manchester City fan, for my sins, and they’ll be playing Hull City at home. If you’re away from your home and family you’ll miss what Christmas is all about: conversation, sitting down for a meal, exchanging presents with loved ones, sharing laughter, building relationships with your family and, for some people, shared worship. Of course, if they’re feeling really energetic people could even try turning off the television! After all, the message of Christmas is an alternative to the pressures of commercialisation: it’s a simple story about family, relationships and God’s love for the world. I think people do see through the huge pressures from commerce that surround Christmas and most of us put a great deal of energy into the festive period. That’s what a lot of present-buying is about: it’s because people want their family life to work out well. NO WayNO How Share 0 1 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Only when there’s a war on and then only on the front line…. 0 1 MarcelaProustPlease be aware that Boxing Day does not get its name from any form of pugilism but from a bygone tradition of giving presents in boxes. Also, if Merseyside police officers only get one Xmas day off in five then that might be something to do with crime on Merseyside. And of course if you had football on top they might be struggling to cope.I’m an atheist but am against football on Xmas Day as it would devalue Boxing Day – the best sporting day in the year – just as Sky has devalued every Saturday at 3pm, and would mean that I’d miss at least one home game a season due to lack of public transport if my beloved team were at home on either Boxing Day or Xmas Day. Last year I had to cycle a round trip of 40 miles, often through rural areas with no street lighting to do my Xmas worshipping and I’m not doing that again. This year we’re home on Sunday so I can get the train.And if the idea comes from the USA then just say no. Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Twitter 24 Dec 2008 19:56 The NBA have gone mad and schedule five games on Christmas Day, which I guess prompted the topic. Topics Show 25 | Pick Share Share on Twitter 100 Happy Festivus–for the rest of us! Report Share via Email Share on Facebook Report Share 0 1 0 1 0 1 UKOH Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Facebook dixonbainbridge Share expanded Share Report Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Report 24 Dec 2008 19:50 Facebook Share on Facebook Share Share on Facebook Share on Facebook All recommendations | Pick 0 1 0 1 24 Dec 2008 20:52 0 1 blogposts Share on Twitter | Pick Support The Guardian Close report comment form Twitter Twitter Report | Pick Share Facebook Share on Facebook | Pick Reply Twitter 24 Dec 2008 9:42 mebluewolf2last_img read more

GT Scores TakeNothing Defense Attorneys Fees in Spy Pen Case

first_img Password Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Can a ballpoint pen change the fate in your case? Two Dallas Greenberg Traurig lawyers proved to a local jury last week that it can indeed – especially if the pen is really a hidden camera . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Remember me Lost your password?last_img

5th Circuit Judges Should Think Twice in Keeping Search Affidavits Sealed

first_img Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Remember me Armed federal agents raided a suburban Houston aviation company 16 months ago based on a sealed affidavit. The result: employees quit, customers fled and the business went bankrupt. Agents still have not charged the business owner with a crime, but they will not let him see the affidavit either. But the Fifth Circuit, in an obscure ruling this week, said yes to greater access to court records in the pre-indictment stage. The Lawbook has the details . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Lost your password? Usernamelast_img

Researchers sequence complete mitochondrial genome of malaria mosquitoes

first_imgJul 31 2018A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. This milestone, published in June in Scientific Reports, offers a glimpse inside this insect’s genetic diversity, ancestral history, and evolution–information that researchers might eventually exploit to develop new ways to prevent this deadly disease.Study leads Douglas E. Norris, PhD, MS, a professor in the Bloomberg School’s departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology and International Health, and Giovanna Carpi, PhD, DVM, a Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Bloomberg School have found that the vast majority of malaria vector research has focused on Anopheles gambiae, considered to be the primary transmitter of this disease.However, although An. funestus is a close second–responsible for helping to transmit most of the world’s approximately 216 million cases that cause half a million deaths annually–few genetic studies have focused on this species due to its comparative difficulty to rear in the lab.”An. funestus is definitely understudied, even though it’s a critical malaria vector,” says Norris, who is also on faculty at the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute. “We need to know more to move forward.”As a pivotal step toward better understanding this mosquito species, Norris and his colleagues decided to sequence its mitochondrial genome–the DNA inside mitochondria, the cellular organelles that supply the cell with power. Compared to the genome derived from the cellular nucleus, the mitochondrial genome tends to be smaller in most organisms and is passed down the maternal line rather than from both parents, providing a clearer look at ancient ancestry and population-level distinctions.The researchers started by capturing An. funestus mosquitoes from locations in Tanzania; the Democratic Republic of Congo; and Zambia, where the federal International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research project maintains a study site. After extracting mitochondrial DNA from 43 of these insects, Norris and his colleagues deep sequenced and analyzed it.Sophisticated analysis of the 43 full-length “mitogenomes” pointed to a long evolutionary history of An. funestus. Distinct differences at 41 sites along the insects’ mitogenomes divided them largely into two different lineages, confirming earlier work from another laboratory. Estimates based on how quickly mitochondrial DNA mutates suggest that these two lineages, dubbed simply lineage 1 and 2, split from a common ancestor about 500,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene period. Although both lineages were previously identified in Zambia, lineage 2 wasn’t known to exist in Tanzania.Related StoriesMalaria drug may help those with hereditary hearing loss finds studyHuman liver cell protein aids development of malaria parasite, study findsResearchers discover new neurotoxin that selectively targets mosquitoesA further look at lineage 1 suggests that it is composed of at least two distinct genetic groups itself, Norris adds. “This suggests that An. funestus has a lot more genetic diversity than has ever been documented,” he says.In Zambia and Tanzania, at least, these two lineages are sympatric, existing at the same place at the same time. However, this genetic diversity suggests that the species might be splitting into separate species. Although this process that can take a millennium or more, Norris explains, the two lineages might already be displaying differences in their ability to carry organisms that cause malaria–protozoa in the Plasmodia genus–behavior in foraging for blood, or insecticide resistance. These differences could potentially be used to develop new vector-based strategies to prevent malaria transmission.The mitogenome diversity within this species could also eventually be used to better understand how different mosquito populations are interbreeding–and potentially sharing genes that could be useful or harmful to malaria-control efforts–and whether interventions directed at this vector are successful, Norris adds.”Right now, having a complete mitochondrial genome for An. funestus is interesting from an academic and evolutionary view,” he says. “But eventually, we might be able to use what we’ve found to build whole new strategies to combat malaria.””Complete Anopheles funestus mitogenomes reveal an ancient history of mitochondrial lineages and their distribution in southern and central Africa” was written by Christine M. Jones, Yoosook Lee, Andrew Kitchen, Travis Collier, Julia C. Pringle, Mbanga Muleba, Seth Irish, Jennifer C. Stevenson, Maureen Coetzee, Anthony J. Cornel, Douglas E. Norris & Giovanna Carpi. Source:https://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2018/sequencing-a-malaria-mosquitos-motherlne.htmllast_img read more

Earth microbe prefers living on meteorites

first_imgVIENNA—The microbe above is happier living on meteorites than on Earth. So reported scientists here this week at the annual meeting of the European Geosciences Union. The microscopic organism—an archaea known as Metallosphaera sedula (seen as a cluster of tiny dots sitting in the middle of the meteoritic dust particle pictured above)—was originally found in 1989 living in Italy’s hot acidic sulfur springs around Vesuvius. These so-called chemolithotrophs normally feed on iron and sulfur minerals in rocks and leave behind a residue of heavy metals. This makes them useful in mining operations as an environmentally friendly alternative to leaching the metals with toxic chemicals. In the lab, the process looks very similar to watching glass jars full of beer ferment with yeast. To test these microbes’ “astrofermination” capability, the researchers gave them an energy drink made of powdered meteorite and recorded how much nickel they released in the jars. The microbes went on a space dust binge—consuming their samples in only 2 weeks as compared with the 2 months it took for them to munch through their Earth samples. The team says its work could have implications for asteroid mining, where rare metals embedded in space rocks could be extracted and brought back to Earth for use in technological advancements. Future work will include testing the survivability of the microbes in a vacuum and with synthetic martian minerals.last_img read more

University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence

first_imgThe massive Arecibo dish in Puerto Rico was used in a NASA search for alien radio signals before Congress canceled it in 1993. By Steve NadisFeb. 28, 2019 , 8:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The cutoff in federal funding has had a long-term, chilling effect, Wright says. He has identified just five people with Ph.D.s in research related to SETI. “It takes a special kind of person to go into a field that’s unfunded and holds few job prospects,” says Wright, who has, until now, had to pursue SETI as a hobby and sideline to his main job as an exoplanet investigator.The new Penn State center would hire faculty and postdocs and introduce undergraduate and graduate courses. It could eventually offer grants to researchers outside the university.So far, Penn State has received two private gift pledges totaling $3.5 million, which will create a new professorship within the astronomy department and subsidize other SETI research. Although that leaves a considerable sum to be raised, Wright considers it a good start, showing that “this idea is something that resonates.” He believes, moreover, that Penn State is an ideal base for SETI research because it has the pieces needed for such a far-reaching, interdisciplinary enterprise: a strong astronomy department, a NASA-funded Astrobiology Research Center, and the Center for Astrostatistics. The university also serves as the hub for the worldwide Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.Andrew Siemion, director of the SETI Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, applauds the Penn State effort. “Having SETI in the school’s curriculum gives a stamp of approval to the field that is very important,” says Siemion, one of the five aforementioned Ph.D.s who never thought he could carve out a career in SETI.Tarter is similarly enthused. She sees the plans unveiled by Penn State as part of a “resurgence” of the field. She is excited by the steady stream of newly discovered worlds and is anxious to find out whether potentially habitable planets are, in fact, inhabited by intelligent life. “I don’t think you can ask the question of life beyond Earth and stop at microbes,” Tarter says. Email David Parker/Science Source center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is getting a home base. On 1 March, Pennsylvania State University in State College will announce the first contributions to a campaign that hopes to raise $110 million for the new Penn State Extraterrestrial Intelligence (PSETI) Center with endowed professorships and a degree-granting graduate program. It would be one of just a few academic SETI research centers and, if plans are realized, it could be the first to offer courses from the undergraduate to Ph.D. level. Some astronomers say it would provide a badly needed boost to a subdiscipline that has long suffered from neglect.“There really isn’t an academic ecosystem for the field as a whole,” says Penn State astronomer Jason Wright, who will serve as the PSETI Center head. “You can’t work on it if you can’t hire students and postdocs.”Financial backing for SETI research has been scarce ever since 1993, when the U.S. Congress banned NASA from funding it. “We became the four-letter word at NASA,” recalls astronomer Jill Tarter, a co-founder of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, one of the few other centers to support SETI research with nongovernmental funds. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligencelast_img read more

World Health Organization declares Ebola outbreak an international emergency

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe AP Photo/Jerome Delay World Health Organization declares Ebola outbreak an international emergency Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country An Ebola victim was laid to rest Sunday in Beni in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Emailcenter_img The World Health Organization (WHO) today declared that the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which surfaced in August 2018, is an international emergency. The declaration raises the outbreak’s visibility and public health officials hope it will galvanize the international community to fight the spread of the frequently fatal disease.“It is time for the world to take notice and redouble our effort,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. “We all owe it to [current] responders … to shoulder more of the burden.”As of today, Ebola has infected more than 2500 people in the DRC during the new outbreak, killing more than 1650. By calling the current situation a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), WHO in Geneva, Switzerland, has placed it in a rare category that includes the 2009 flu pandemic, the Zika epidemic of 2016, and the 2-year Ebola epidemic that killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa before it ended in 2016. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The declaration does not legally compel member states to do anything. “But it sounds a global alert,” says Lawrence Gostin, a global health lawyer at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. During the West African epidemic, for instance, the U.S. Congress supplied $5.4 billion in the months after WHO’s emergency declaration.Even as they declared the emergency, WHO officials attempted to tamp down reactions they said could harm both the DRC’s economy and efforts to stop the outbreak. “This is still a regional emergency and [in] no way a global threat,” said Robert Steffen, chair of the emergency committee that recommended the PHEIC designation and an epidemiologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, during a press teleconference today. He added in a written statement: “It is … crucial that states do not use the PHEIC as an excuse to impose trade or travel restrictions, which would have a negative impact on the response and on the lives and livelihoods of people in the region.”The DRC’s minister of health, Oly Ilunga Kalenga, issued a statement accepting the declaration but expressing concern about its motives and the potential impact on his country. “The Ministry hopes that this decision is not the result of the many pressures from different stakeholder groups who wanted to use this statement as an opportunity to raise funds for humanitarian actors,” Kalenga wrote. He said such funds could come “despite potentially harmful and unpredictable consequences for the affected communities that depend greatly on cross-border trade for their survival.”Steffen’s committee previously declined three times, most recently last month, to recommend that WHO declare the outbreak an international emergency. What changed, he said today, was the 14 July diagnosis of a case of Ebola in the large, internationally connected city of Goma, DRC, from which 15,000 people cross the border into Rwanda each day; the murders last weekend of two health workers in the city that is now the Ebola epicenter of the DRC; a recurrence of intense transmission in that same city, Beni, meaning the disease now has a geographical reach of 500 kilometers; and the failure, after 11 months, to contain the outbreak.Funding is also at issue. In June, WHO announced its funding to fight the outbreak fell $54 million short; today, accepting the emergency committee’s recommendation, Tedros said the funds needed to stop the virus “will run to the hundreds of millions. Unless the international community steps up and funds the response now, we will be paying for this outbreak for a long time to come.” (A written report from today’s meeting added: “The global community has not contributed sustainable and adequate technical assistance, human or financial resources for outbreak response.”)When the first known Ebola case in Goma was diagnosed this week, concern spiked about international spread. In addition to being a metropolis of nearly 2 million people where Ebola may spread quickly and be difficult to trace, Goma has an international airport. Separately today, the government of Uganda, in conjunction with WHO, issued a statement describing the case of a fish trader who died of Ebola on 15 July; she had traveled from the DRC to Uganda on 11 July before returning to the DRC.“Although there is no evidence yet of local transmission in either Goma or Uganda, these two events represent a concerning geographical expansion of the virus,” Tedros said. The risk of spread in DRC, [and] in the region, remains very high. And the risk of spread outside the region remains low.”Last month, the outbreak’s first known Ebola fatalities outside the DRC were reported in a 5-year-old boy and his grandmother. The two had traveled from the DRC to Uganda after attending the funeral of a relative who died from Ebola.Health officials are also worried about the safety of those battling the outbreak. Since January, WHO has recorded 198 attacks on health facilities and health workers in the DRC, killing seven, including two workers who were murdered during the night of 13–14 July in their home in Beni. The two northeastern DRC provinces that have experienced the outbreak are also plagued by poor infrastructure, political violence, and deep community distrust of health authorities.Josie Golding, epidemics lead at the Wellcome Trust in London, applauded the declaration of the PHEIC. “There is a grave risk of a major increase in numbers or spread to new locations. … This is perhaps the most complicated epidemic the world has ever had to face, yet still the response in the DRC remains overstretched and underfunded.”Gostin called the declaration “long overdue. Until now the world has turned a blind eye to this epidemic. WHO has been soldiering on alone, bravely alone. And it’s beyond WHO’s capacity to deal with all of this violence and community distrust.”PHEICs are governed by the International Health Regulations, a global agreement negotiated in the wake of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak. The regulations, in force since 2007, stipulate that a PHEIC should be declared when an “extraordinary” situation “constitute[s] a public health risk to other States through the international spread of disease” and “potentially require[s] a coordinated international response.”WHO officials also today addressed the thorny conflict over whether a second, experimental Ebola vaccine, in addition to a Merck vaccine that has already been given to 161,000 people in the DRC, should be deployed there now. Officials worry that Merck’s stockpile—although it is being stretched by reducing the dose of the vaccine being given to each recipient—will be depleted before the outbreak ends. But on 11 July, Kalenga gave a firm “no,” rejecting the use of any new experimental vaccine in the country because of unproven effectiveness and the potential for public confusion. (A Johnson and Johnson [J&J] vaccine that has been shown to be safe in healthy volunteers is waiting in the wings and its use has been advocated for by several infectious disease experts.)But today, Michael Ryan, executive director of WHO’s Health Emergencies Programme, said the organization still supports introducing the J&J vaccine if it can win “appropriate national approval.” “The Ministry has expressed concern about introducing a second vaccine … mainly around the issue of confusion in the local population. We are working through those issues about where and when the vaccine could be used,” Ryan said.David Heymann, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and formerly WHO’s assistant director-general for health security and environment, said today’s emergency declaration may have set a precedent. “The Emergency Committee appears to have interpreted the need for funding as one of the reasons a PHEIC was called—this has not been done in the past.” By Meredith WadmanJul. 17, 2019 , 6:25 PMlast_img read more

Hannah Payne Sobs As 911 Call Is Played

first_imgAfter Payne shot Herring, she reportedly told the 911 operator, “He just shot himself with my gun.” She reportedly blocked him from driving away then shot him when he wouldn’t get out of the carSee the photo below of Hannah Payne crying as her devilish ways were heard in court: Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Braford Jr. In case you missed it, Payne was already charged with murdering Herring for the shooting early last month, but grand jury last month indicted Payne on charges of felony murder, malice murder, aggravated assault, false imprisonment and possession of a firearm during a felony, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.Payne had previously been freed on $100,000 bond — something Christine Herring said Payne shouldn’t have been granted.A number of emails sent to NewsOne from people who said they were Payne’s friends insisted the young driver was not racist despite the optics surrounding the case being otherwise. White supremacists paid for robocalls to Clayton County residents referring to Herring as a “negro” and urging anyone who was still listening to “Tell the District Attorney of Clayton County, Georgia, free Hannah Payne.” Hannah Payne is being forced to face the reality that she shot and killed Kenneth Herring for no reason other than being a savage vigilante. Now the 22-year-old was forced to hear the 911 call of her inhumane ways and she allegedly had a breakdown right in court.READ MORE: Candace Owens Reportedly ‘Influenced’ New Zealand Mosque TerroristWSB-TV reports she was denied bond after the tragic 911 call was played in the courtroom. Although the call is not public, Clayton County Police Detective Keon Hayward testified last month that Payne could be heard saying to Herring on the May 7 call, “Get out of the car, get out of the car, get out of the fucking car! I’m going to shoot you!” While the situation was reminiscent of last year’s spate of white women trying to police Black people, it also bore similarities to the killing of Trayvon Martin in 2012. In that instance, neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman shot and killed the innocent and unarmed Black teen. That was even after 911 operators told Zimmerman, an adult, not to approach the teen.Let’s hope justice is served.SEE ALSO:All The Ways Cops Are Still Trying To Cover Up LaQuan McDonald’s ExecutionOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMore30Share to EmailEmailEmail Jesse Jackson Demands ‘Justice Now’ At EJ Bradford’s Moving Funeral Ceremony A judge denied bond for the woman accused of murdering a man after a hit and run. We also heard the 911 call where you hear her ordering the victim out of the car. You will hear it only on Channel 2 tonight at 5. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/dOsS63lpEU— Tom Jones (@TomJonesWSBTV) July 12, 2019 A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ More By NewsOne Staff Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Clayton County , Grand Jury , Hannah Payne , hit-and-run , Kenneth Herring last_img read more

Top stories Science and the slave trade tweeting and not flying and

first_img(left to right): THE JOHN CARTER BROWN LIBRARY AT BROWN UNIVERSITY; ROGER HART/UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY; JULIO LACERDA/STUDIO 252MYA Top stories: Science and the slave trade, tweeting and (not) flying, and Snowball Earth’s thaw Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Historians expose early scientists’ debt to the slave tradeThe progressive nature of science has made it hard for historians to take a critical look at its past. But researchers are starting to uncover new connections between science and the slave trade that show just how deeply intertwined they once were. In order to gain access to Africa and the Americas, for example, most early naturalists hitched a ride on a slaving ship. Now, modern scientists and historians are grappling with the horrific origins of some of the world’s most extensive natural history collections.Tweeting while flying kills migratory birds Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Alex FoxApr. 5, 2019 , 2:20 PM Texting while driving can be deadly. So can tweeting while flying, a new study finds—among some species of migratory birds. Researchers have found that birds using faint, high-frequency vocalizations known as flight calls during their nighttime migrations are losing their bearings, crashing into buildings, and possibly luring more birds to their untimely ends.Ancient ‘Snowball Earth’ thawed out in a flashMore than half a billion years ago, our planet was a giant snowball. Glaciers blanketed the globe all the way to the equator in one of the mysterious “Snowball Earth” events geologists think occurred at least twice in Earth’s ancient past. Now, scientists have found that the final snowball episode likely ended in a flash about 635 million years ago—a geologically fast event that may have implications for today’s human-driven global warming.Our mysterious cousins—the Denisovans—may have mated with modern humans as recently as 15,000 years agoThe elusive Denisovans, the extinct cousins of Neanderthals, are known from only the scraps of bone they left in Siberia’s Denisova Cave in Russia and the genetic legacy they bequeathed to living people across Asia. A new study of that legacy in people from New Guinea suggests that, far from being a single group, these mysterious humans were so diverse that their populations were as distantly related to each other as they were to Neanderthals. The study also implies that one of those groups may have survived long enough to have encountered modern humans.Does your cat know its name? Here’s how to find outFor the first time, researchers have experimentally shown that cats have some understanding of what we’re saying to them. Japanese scientists played recordings of different words before playing a recording of a feline’s actual name. The random words evoked no response, but as soon as the cats heard their name, most moved their ears and heads; a few even got up. But whether the cats understand what their name means—and that it’s just not another word for “treat”—remains unclear.last_img read more

West Bengal TMC cornered BJP takes lead in tracking cut money agents

first_img Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach On the ground, meanwhile, the political tussle continues. “The party has asked us to collect signatures of people who gave cut money after applying for the Banglar Bari (housing) scheme. Some people have signed, but the others are scared that they will land in trouble. We are trying to convince them,” says Tarak Dhar, a BJP worker at Berela village in Hooghly. Mamata to MLAs: Don’t cede an inch to BJP, apologise to people Best Of Express Part I | Grassroot TMC leaders face cut-money blowback in Bengal: ‘Can’t return home’Soon after Banerjee’s call, State Minister and senior TMC leader Firhad Hakim accused the BJP of instigating the violence “to create unrest in Bengal”. BJP state president Dilip Ghosh responded by calling for “a gherao of TMC representatives to get back the cut money with interest”.The Indian Express travelled through 12 villages in Hooghly, Bardhaman and Birbhum to map the political faultlines beneath the wave of anger against “cut money”. And found that while local TMC leaders are on the run, residents are turning to a well-oiled support system put in place by the BJP — from “declaration forms” under its letterhead to “public hearings”.“We are with the people’s legitimate demand for cut money refunds. We are just streamlining the agitation,” says Mondol in Chanok village. West Bengal: TMC cornered, BJP takes lead in tracking cut money agents Saranika Mondal, BJP’s Hooghly district secretary, says the party is drawing up a list of “corrupt TMC leaders”. (Express Photo: Partha Paul)Inside a saw mill at Chanok village in Bardhaman district, Subrata Mondol is poring over a pile of “declaration forms” with personal details of residents and their signatures. Each form names the recipient of a government scheme and the “cut money” allegedly paid to local TMC leaders to avail the benefit. LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Kolkata: CM Mamata Banerjee hits streets to raise awareness on water conservation Biswas and Majumdar have “gone missing”, say residents. Saranika says the BJP is preparing a list of “corrupt TMC leaders”. “Soon, the people will gherao their houses. We will make them return the money,” she says.The other Opposition parties, Congress and Left, failed to make any impact in the Lok Sabha polls but have registered their presence in the agitation against “cut money”. On June 24 and 25, their MLAs staged a walkout from the state assembly. Apart from the RSS-backed ABVP, SFI activists too held a rally on July 2 to protest against commissions allegedly taken by the TMC’s students wing for benefits in state colleges.Listen to Express Audio: TMC’s ‘cut money’ blowbackCornered in its own backyard, the TMC has started organising rallies in various districts to improve its “public relations”. “It (the agitation) is a planned conspiracy by the BJP to attack our leaders. We are already campaigning for our party’s Martyrs Day rally on July 21. We are also focusing on public relations and taking out processions,” says TMC’s Hooghly district leader Prabir Ghosal.On June 10, the ruling party set up a special cell, a toll-free number and an email ID for people to air their grievances. On June 25, the state government created a new post to curb economic offences by public representatives, with IPS officer Tanmay Ray Chaudhuri being appointed as Deputy Director, Directorate of Economic Offences.Speaking to The Indian Express, a senior police says the government may also charge elected public representatives and government functionaries who accept “cut money” under a tough law that provides for life imprisonment.“The corrupt officials will be charged under Section 409 of the IPC, which relates to criminal breach of trust by a public servant, banker, merchant or agent. A person convicted under the law is liable to be punished with imprisonment for life, or with imprisonment for a term which may extend to ten years, besides fine,” says the officer. SPs of all districts have also been asked to take action as soon as they receive formal complaints. Mondol is the BJP’s booth committee chief in the village. “We have printed forms for various schemes, mostly for housing and toilets. So far, 180 people have filled the forms. We will send the forms with complaint letters to the administration and police. We are with the people,” he says.On June 18, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee asked her party leaders to return the “cut money”, or illegal commissions, they had allegedly collected from people to “facilitate” various government schemes. This led to angry gatherings across rural Bengal, with many assaulting the TMC’s local representatives and forcing them either promise in writing to pay up or flee their homes.It has also opened up a new political front in the state between the TMC and the BJP, which surged to 18 seats in the Lok Sabha elections with around 40 per cent of the vote share. Advertising Advertising Related News More Explained Advertising Delhi court summons Mamta Banerjee’s nephew over ‘false affidavit’ Written by Ravik Bhattacharya, Santanu Chowdhury | Birbhum, Hooghly, Purba Bardhaman | Updated: July 4, 2019 11:03:05 am Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan Taking stock of monsoon rain At Boinchi in Hooghly, the BJP is at the forefront of planning protests, drawing up lists, lodging mass complaints and organising gheraos outside the houses of local TMC leaders.Part II | In West Bengal, TMC men’s cut money rate list: Rs 200 for last rites, Rs 25,000 for house“We have prepared a list of 32 residents who have come on record to say that they have given cut money to TMC leaders for LPG connections under the Ujjwala scheme. We have submitted a complaint to the police station and the office of the Block Development Officer along with signatures,” says Saranika Mondal, who is the BJP’s district secretary in Hooghly.The complaint reads: “We, the undersigned residents of Nuniadanga village in Hooghly district, inform you that local TMC leaders Subhas Biswas and Sikha Majumdar have taken Rs 500 from us to help us get LPG connections through the Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana. Recently, we came to know that no money is needed to get such connections. It was a conspiracy to take Rs 500 from each one of us. We request you to take action against the culprits and ensure that we get our money back.” 34 Comment(s)last_img read more

Surging RD spending in China narrows gap with United States

first_img China’s total spending on R&D rose a robust 12.3% last year to a record 1.76 trillion yuan ($254 billion), according to a government report released yesterday. Already second in the world in R&D spending behind the United States, China has narrowed the gap.Figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) show that in 2012, China spent about 34% as much as the United States, a figure that rose to 44% in 2016, the most recent year for which data are available. In terms of purchasing power parity, however, China’s 2016 spending was equivalent to 88% of U.S. spending.”The year-to-year growth in R&D spending indicates firm governmental and social support for making China a scientific power,” says Xie Xuemei, a specialist in innovation economics at Shanghai University in China. “However, there is still a long way to go” to match the research capabilities of developed countries, she adds. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Surging R&D spending in China narrows gap with United States STR/AFP/Getty Images The report from the ministries of science and finance and the National Bureau of Statistics highlights other notable trends in 2017, including a 12.5% increase in spending by businesses—including foreign-owned corporations—to 1.36 trillion yuan ($196.4 billion). “More and more enterprises realize that to improve their competitive advantage, they must rely on their independent innovation capabilities, [which] rely on greater spending on R&D,” Xie says. Basic research expenditures were also up, hitting 97.55 billion yuan ($14.1 billion), an increase of 18.5%. For comparison, the United States spent $86.32 billion on basic research in 2016, according to OECD. A national innovation strategy that strives to harness R&D to economic growth has been driving the increase in both government and industrial R&D spending in recent years, Xie says.Accounting differences between China and other countries make international comparisons tricky, says Cao Cong, a science policy specialist at the University of Nottingham Ningbo in China. China’s statistics lump R&D funding with a range of other science and technology expenditures, such as support for science communications, administration, and scientific exchanges and cooperation. On the other hand, when figuring spending on basic research, China often excludes capital investment in facilities and university faculty salaries, costs typically included in the basic category by other countries. But even if basic spending is undercounted, it is probably a smaller share of overall research spending than in the United States and other advanced countries, Cao says. And that level “is not enough for China to become a scientific power.”A government mid- to long-term science and technology plan sets a spending target for R&D of 2.5% of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2020, up from 2.13% in 2017. By comparison, the United States spent 2.7% of GDP in 2016, according to OECD. “The question is whether the increased amount of money spent on R&D is effective and efficient,” Cao says. This spring the National People’s Congress decided to merge the National Natural Science Foundation, which supported a large share of the country’s basic research efforts through reviewed grants, into the Ministry of Science and Technology, which has managed nationally important big science projects. The move has raised concerns that support for basic research by small groups might suffer. The future impact on science funding and management “is something worth paying attention to,” Cao says. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img The world’s largest radio telescope, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope is one product of China’s growing spending on research. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Dennis NormileOct. 10, 2018 , 12:45 PMlast_img read more

Martian dust devils may create rare rocket fuel ingredient

first_img The Red Planet is a rich source of perchlorates—chemical compounds used in fertilizer and rocket fuel that are rarely formed naturally on Earth. Now, lab experiments suggest how the unusual compounds are created on Mars: from the electrical fields formed by global dust storms, as well as whirlwinds known as dust devils.For more than 5 years, scientists have surmised that perchlorates are relatively common on Mars, thanks to evidence from the Phoenix Mars lander and the Curiosity rover. On Earth, the chemical reactions that generate these compounds are typically powered by sunlight. But models of atmospheric chemistry suggest mere sunlight isn’t enough to do the trick on Mars. Instead, they indicate that strong electric fields, such as those created by static electricity in global dust storms, could break down gases in the martian atmosphere and thus drive perchlorate-generating reactions.To test that notion in the lab, researchers put a gas mixture representing the martian atmosphere—95% carbon dioxide, 2% nitrogen, 2% argon, and 1% oxygen—in a large chamber, along with a source of chlorine, table salt. The researchers decreased temperature and pressure in the chamber until they matched Mars-like conditions. They then exposed the mixture to electric fields of the magnitude likely present inside martian dust storms and dust devils (seen from orbit, above). By Sid PerkinsOct. 29, 2018 , 12:35 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Martian dust devils may create rare rocket fuel ingredient Email University of Arizona/JPL-Caltech/NASA Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Almost immediately, some of the gases in the chamber broke down to form highly reactive, positively charged versions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen molecules. Over time, reactions generated substantial amounts of chlorates (ions that contain one chlorine atom and three oxygen atoms) and perchlorates. The team estimates rates of perchlorate formation inside martian dust storms could be as much as 10 million times higher than those driven by sunlight, the researchers report in Earth and Planetary Science Letters.To astrobiologists, perchlorates are intriguing. Although these substances are toxic to humans—and thus could endanger potential human settlements on Mars—some microbes can to use perchlorates to fuel their metabolism.last_img read more

Interweaving anxiety disorder associated with stuttering remains unrecognized

first_img Source:https://www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au/ Oct 23 2018While stuttering impacts the lives of approximately 1-2 percent of adults and around 4-5 percent of children, the mental health impact of this disorder largely remains unrecognized. This in turn, compromises the full effectiveness of speech pathology treatment and prevents people who stutter seeking evidence-based psychological therapies provided by qualified mental health professionals.Research shows that over 20 per cent of 7-12 year olds seeking stuttering therapy and, at least 40 per cent of adults, suffer the additional disability of an interweaving anxiety disorder. Like stuttering itself, an interweaving anxiety disorder impacts dramatically on an individual’s social and occupational wellbeing.“Sadly, at this time not a lot is known about the mental health impact or the interweaving anxiety disorder associated with stuttering in an Australian context,” said Gaenor Dixon, the National President of Speech Pathology Australia.“While stuttering has been shown to be associated with same quality of life impairments as stroke, diabetes and heart disease, it receives far less attention and publicity, and remains poorly understood by the wider Australian community.“The early diagnosis of stuttering and access to speech pathology remains key, though the management of related anxiety may be essential for some individuals.”There is little doubt that people with significant anxiety should be provided access to a qualified professional, such as a clinical psychologist. For many, the combined approach of a speech pathologist and clinical psychologist is needed to achieve the best results for individuals who stutter.Australian Speak Easy Association (the peak body in Australia for people who stutter) and Speech Pathology Australia (the peak body for speech pathologists) are seeking urgent government action to ensure support for greater research into the relationship between anxiety and stuttering, as well as greater awareness particularly in schools.Related StoriesNew study examines non‐medical use of anti-anxiety medicationStudy finds depression and anxiety symptoms among many asylum seekersNew study explores link between traffic-related air pollution and childhood anxiety“For some people stuttering is far more than just a disability related to the moment of speech”, says Mark Irwin, National President of the Australian Speak Easy Association.“Instead sufferers are known to avoid social encounters and limit use of words during conversation. They say what they can rather than what they know to be appropriate or truly reflective of their thoughts. They make life choices, including subject choices at school, based on worry about the impact of their inability to communicate, and how their stuttering might be perceived by others”.Both organizations are seeking a three pronged approach to this problem.1. Recognition that mental health diagnoses for people who stutter are known to impact negatively on the full effectiveness of speech therapy, and therefore there is the need for comprehensive assessment and service provision if therapy outcomes are to be improved.2. Recognition that a social anxiety disorder that interweaves with stuttering is a significant health condition that impacts dramatically on emotional well-being, social functioning and occupational achievement.3. Funding for research into the efficacy of combining speech pathology and psychological treatment for stuttering.These matters will be discussed at the Australian Speak Easy Association national conference to be held in Melbourne on 26-28 October.The conference, which is open to all professionals treating stuttering as well as members of the general public, will feature an update on genetic research and a free parent /child workshop. More details are available from the Australian Speak Easy Association website or 0414 731 565.Monday 22 October is International Stuttering Awareness Day.last_img read more

Neuroscientists question effectiveness of using electrical currents to improve memory

first_img Source:https://www.kingston.ac.uk/news/article/2177/28-mar-2019-do-electrodes-make-you-smarter-kingston-university-neuroscientist-casts-doubt-on-benefit-of-using-electric/ Image credit: www.modup.net/Dr Giulia Galli from the University’s Faculty of Business and Social Sciences was part of an international research team that investigated transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). The technique involves delivering a weak electrical current to specific parts of the brain using electrodes attached to the head. Related StoriesStudy offers clues about how to prevent brain inflammation in Alzheimer’sNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionThe team evaluated the effects of tDCS across a range of variables, including length of administration, nature of the memory encoding task and age of the participants. A significant enhancement of memory performance was only found when tDCS was delivered in more difficult memory tasks. The longer the technique was applied, the more effective it was and this improvement was evident in adults of all ages.The team’s findings provided insight for the scientific community into how this technique can be used effectively and would help to set out the optimal conditions for the use of tCDS for neuro-rehabilitation of patients with memory decline, Dr Galli said.Dr Giulia Galli said: Working with colleagues from the universities of Essex, Madrid and Moscow, Dr Galli analyzed findings from all existing studies examining the effectiveness of the technique on long term memory. In the past five years concerns had been raised about the low number of participants involved in studies of tCDS, the design of experiments and publication bias – with positive results seemingly more frequently published, Dr Galli explained. TCDS has real potential to improve mental functions relating to memory, but only works under certain circumstances. If we want it to be effective we need to get those conditions right, otherwise we’re missing opportunities to support patients. This research takes us a step closer to identifying those specifics.” The results of the study were published in neuroscience journal Brain Stimulation. Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 1 2019The effectiveness of applying electrical currents to the brain to improve memory and enhance cognitive ability – often used to treat Alzheimer’s patients and children with developmental disorders – has been thrown into question by neuroscientists at Kingston University in London. During the past 15 years, increasing numbers of academics have started to use tDCS with a great deal of enthusiasm, claiming it can improve a range of neurological functions – including enhancing memory in Alzheimer’s patients and improving dyscalculia in children with developmental disorders. The technique is relatively cheap and easy to use compared to other brain stimulation techniques – specially-designed caps are even available for people to try it at home – and in almost every field of mental processes research contends that it works. Yet there are now real question marks over the evidence for those claims.”Dr Giulia Galli, University’s Faculty of Business and Social Sciences The claim for many years has been that this technique is like a miracle cure. Yet, in examining all 28 published studies looking at the impact of tCDS on long term memory, we found no statistically significant effect when all the data was taken together. We’re not saying the technique is not effective in all cases, but we need to know under what specific circumstances it does have an impact.”Dr Giulia Gallilast_img read more

Microglia play vital role in regulating neuroinflammation research shows

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 23 2019A research team at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has shown that microglia, the primary immune cells of the central nervous system–including the retina of the eye–serve as “gatekeepers,” or biosensors and facilitators, of neuroinflammation in a preclinical model of autoimmune uveitis. Uveitis is one of the leading causes of blindness, accounting for approximately 10% of significant visual impairment worldwide.In a report published online today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the researchers describe, for the first time, a role for microglia in directing the initiation of autoimmune uveitis by orchestrating the inflammatory response within the retina. In reaction to disease induction, microglia closely associate with the retinal vasculature and facilitate inflammatory immune cell entry past the blood-brain, or ocular, barrier into the retina. When the researchers depleted microglia in this model, they observed that the disease was completely blocked.”Normally, the blood-brain barrier serves as an impediment and prevents the immune response from going into tissues of the central nervous system, including the retina. However, our results provide clear evidence, that in the context of uveitis, microglia can facilitate entry of inflammatory immune cells into the retina, and enable the host immune responses to attack cells that are not normally recognized by the immune system,” said senior author Kip M. Connor, PhD, vision researcher at Mass. Eye and Ear and Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. “Until now, the role of microglia in retinal disease has not been fully understood, but our research shows–for the first time–that these cells serve as gatekeepers from the immune system to the central nervous system. This gateway not only has implications for treating uveitis, but may provide future avenues for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier for other diseases of the central nervous system.”Despite significant advances in research and therapeutics, the prevalence of uveitis has not been reduced in the past 30 years. Uveitis is characterized as inflammation of the retina as well as the uveal tissues, optic nerve and vitreous, wherein a large influx of immune cells into the eye coincides with elevated inflammatory destruction. Uveitis caused by an autoimmune disease occurs in a variety of diseases including Bechet’s disease, sarcoidosis, and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease. Patients with uveitis often suffer serious visual loss after persistent inflammation due to immune-mediated damage to the neuronal cells of the retina.Related StoriesPatientSource’s e-prescribing technology reduces prescription errors at RHNWhat happens when you eliminate sugar and adopt the keto diet?Botulinum toxin may offer relief from chronic pelvic pain in women with endometriosisSince microglia have multiple phenotypes and/or different stages of activation that can be associated with either harmful or beneficial effects in disease pathogenesis, their role and function in disease progression is not well defined. Researchers across all fields of medicine have recently begun to elucidate the function of microglial cells in various conditions. For example, in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases of the brain, microglia are thought to be harmful. In ophthalmology, it is known that microglial cells are activated in response to a number of developmental and disease indications and their roles in disease are thought to be context-dependent, where they can be either beneficial or harmful.”These findings provide the first insights into how microglia respond and function during a systemic autoimmune disease targeting the eye,” said lead author Yoko Okunuki, MD, PhD, an investigator in Dr. Connor’s laboratory and Instructor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School.”This novel work by Dr. Connor and colleagues identifies that microglia regulate entry through the blood-retinal barrier, and it is our hope that these finding can be harnessed for future targeted therapies for uveitis,” says Joan W. Miller, MD, the David Glendenning Cogan Professor and Chair of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, Chief of Ophthalmology at Mass. Eye and Ear and Massachusetts General Hospital, and Ophthalmologist-in-Chief at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “It is becoming increasingly clear that microglia are involved in a number of retinal disorders as well as neuroinflammatory disorders of the central nervous system.Source: https://www.masseyeandear.org/news/press-releases/2019/04/microglia-shown-to-regulate-neuroinflammationlast_img read more

Research reveals important brain mechanisms for action of psychotherapy in panic disorder

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 1 2019A new investigation published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics disclosed important brain mechanisms for the action of psychotherapy in panic disorder. Patients with panic disorder (PD) and agoraphobia (AG) often suffer from other mental disorders especially social anxiety disorder. Neurally, both disorders exhibit substantial neurofunctional overlap within the defensive system network. Those networks might be crucial in social anxiety due to the high relevance of detecting social cues.Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskFear conditioning serves as a model for the development, maintenance and treatment of anxiety disorders via CBT. It involves several neural pathways that have been partly identified as pathophysiological correlates of panic, agoraphobia and social anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CBT specifically tailored to target panic disorder and agoraphobia, also targets clinical and neurofunctional correlates of secondary social anxiety.Results suggested a signature associated with secondary social anxiety, encompassing two functional systems: first, this signature extends throughout the ventral object recognition pathway, which is related to the recognition of social cues and thus social anxiety symptomatology; second, comorbid social anxiety further amplifies the activation of defensive system structures (e.g., hippocampus and IFO) possibly indicating stronger conditionability as a function of comorbidity. Findings showed that both systems were effectively targeted by CBT, resulting in attenuated activation patterns to the level of patients with panic disorder, agoraphobia and comorbid social anxiety.Source: https://www.karger.com/last_img read more